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Cleaning House

A Mom's Twelve-Month Experiment to Rid Her Home of Youth Entitlement

Author Kay Wills Wyma
Narrator Tavia Gilbert
Runtime 8.3 Hrs. - Unabridged
Publisher christianaudio
Downloads ZIP M4B MP3
Release Date April 30, 2012
Availability: Unrestricted (available worldwide)

Do your kids think that clean, folded clothes magically appear in their drawers? Do they roll their eyes when you suggest they clean the bathroom? Do you think it's your job to pave their road to success? As parents, so often we hover, race in to save, and do everything we can for our kids--unintentionally reinforcing their belief that the world revolves around them.


When Kay Wyma realized that an attitude of entitlement had crept into her home, this mother of five got some attitude of her own. Cleaning House is her account of a year-long campaign to introduce her kids to basic life skills. From making beds to grocery shopping to refinishing a deck chair, the Wyma family experienced for themselves the ways meaningful work can transform self-absorption into earned self-confidence and concern for others.


With irresistible humor and refreshing insights, Kay candidly details the ups and downs of removing her own kids from the center of the universe. The changes that take place in her household will inspire you to launch your own campaign against youth entitlement. As Kay says, "Here's to seeing what can happen when we tell our kids, 'I believe in you, and I'm going to prove it by putting you to work.'"

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Description

Do your kids think that clean, folded clothes magically appear in their drawers? Do they roll their eyes when you suggest they clean the bathroom? Do you think it's your job to pave their road to success? As parents, so often we hover, race in to save, and do everything we can for our kids--unintentionally reinforcing their belief that the world revolves around them.


When Kay Wyma realized that an attitude of entitlement had crept into her home, this mother of five got some attitude of her own. Cleaning House is her account of a year-long campaign to introduce her kids to basic life skills. From making beds to grocery shopping to refinishing a deck chair, the Wyma family experienced for themselves the ways meaningful work can transform self-absorption into earned self-confidence and concern for others.


With irresistible humor and refreshing insights, Kay candidly details the ups and downs of removing her own kids from the center of the universe. The changes that take place in her household will inspire you to launch your own campaign against youth entitlement. As Kay says, "Here's to seeing what can happen when we tell our kids, 'I believe in you, and I'm going to prove it by putting you to work.'"

Customer Reviews

8 Reviews Add Review
A great listen. Informative and entertaining!
I have listened to this book twice now and will keep it in my audiolibrary for future listens! Great storytelling, wonderful ideas and challenges, and great use of bible verses. Thanks for reminding me to teach my youngsters how to take care of themselves and be good citizens!
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 4/26/2016)
Interesting View On Youth Entitlement
Cleaning House by Kay Wills Wyma is a fascinating book about modern day parenting, youth entitlement and ways to raise strong, independent children. It is presented in a journal style as Kay conducted her year-long experiment to remove the youth entitlement that was evident in her children’s lives.

She rightly points out that today’s parenting involves doing everything possible for your children and making sure they are happy at the expense of actually learning anything new. As part of the experiment the book is based on, she gets the children involved in chores around the house ranging from small chores like making beds and helping clean-up to large chores like preparing meals, doing washing and helping with handyman tasks where possible.

I found this book very interesting as I am no longer a teenager but not yet a parent, so I approached it more from the teenager’s opinion than the parent’s opinion. Initially my opinion of the book was quite sceptical in terms of using children to do meal preparation and handyman tasks but I can definitely see the benefits for both parents and children in this experiment. In the end children playing video games all day will not help them when they have to fend for themselves in the future.

The narration was very good once again. Tavia Gilbert is very good at making these books come to life and she adds a lot of expression to the audio.

This book is a great resource for parents with children or teenagers who believe that money grows on trees and that their mother is just there to serve them day and night. In a culture based around selfishness this book has a refreshing focus on helping others and in the process creating strong children.

This audio book was gifted as a part of the christianaudio Reviewers Program in exchange for my unbiased review of this work. More information can be found about this and other Christian audio books at christianaudio.com.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 9/2/2012)
Excellent Information and Concepts!
I am not sure how many other people have noticed the problem of youth entitlement in kids these days, but I have. I don't like it. In fact, I saw it even before I had my own children and decided that I was not going to have spoiled rotten brats that took everything for granted. Some people might say, "Easier said than done," but in reality, it has not been impossible, it is just a lot of work. I believe this may be what parenting in the old days was like before sports and expensive activities took over family time. But, as I did not live in the old days, my parenting style is most definitely not mainstream.


So, when I first saw the opportunity to review this book, I was skeptical at first as most books by Christian authors tend to produce children that I honestly cannot stand to be around. I decided to give this book a chance and was pleasantly surprised that we agree on many things. Of course not everything, but we absolutely agree on the idea that people were created to work and not to be given handouts as a reward for their existence.

Cleaning House: A Mom's 12 Month Experiment To Rid Her Home of Youth Entitlement, by Kay Wills Wyma is the perfect beginner book for parents that have realized that yes...they are in fact enabling youth entitlement in their home. This is also the perfect book for new fathers and mothers to teach their children that everyone must contribute something to keep the peace.

In her twelve months of experiments Kay tackles everything from keeping rooms clean and making meals, to home maintenance and running errands. Through the process she also shares how it is not just a struggle for her five children to learn time management (a life skill) and get their responsibilities taken care of, but also for her to let go, stop enabling and allow her children to prove they could do it both for her and for themselves.

What I loved about this book was all of the quotes from various articles, books, and specialists that seem to be ignored in our culture. They have been warning about the dangers of youth entitlement for decades, but are usually received with a deaf ear. We are now seeing the dangers as youth suicide is on the rise, petty theft is happening in younger and younger ages (because they "deserve" what someone else has worked for), and crime from children who are bored and have nothing better to do with their time.

What I was not comfortable with was that this book was written by someone with overly privileged children. Yes, I know that sort of family is more in need of this advice, but for parents like us that do not own a huge house (where every child has their own bedroom and bathroom) with a pool and every gadget known to mankind to entertain their children...it made me feel very small. Also, as their children both attend public schools and watch television (with commercials that say, "buy me!") it was hard for me to identify with the attitudes of her children. My children are not perfect, but they don't succumb to "normal" social pressure which I will elaborate on in an upcoming post.

Overall, I did like the concepts in the book. The narrator (as this was an audio book for me) did an excellent job in conveying the information and great voice inflection. I do encourage anyone who has been frustrated with their children thinking that everything must be done for them, or children who just do not appreciate anything to snap this book up and read it right away (or listen to the audio version)! After you read this book, do some heart searching and then implement a plan, your children will be able to truly handle life in the future in ways that no amount of sports or activities will be able to prepare them.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 7/10/2012)
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