Audiobook Download

The Heavenly Man

Audiobook Download
The Heavenly Man
Author Brother Yun
Narrator Christopher Jean
Runtime 10 Hrs. - Unabridged
Publisher christianaudio Hovel
Downloads ZIP M4B MP3
Availability: Unrestricted (available worldwide)

You've seen the headlines - government crackdowns on Chinese house churches; mass arrests and human rights violations...But this intensely dramatic autobiography makes it real! Learn how God took a young half-starved boy from Henan Province and enabled him to stand strong on the front lines for Jesus, braving horrific opposition and impossible odds.

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Description

You've seen the headlines - government crackdowns on Chinese house churches; mass arrests and human rights violations...But this intensely dramatic autobiography makes it real! Learn how God took a young half-starved boy from Henan Province and enabled him to stand strong on the front lines for Jesus, braving horrific opposition and impossible odds.

20 Reviews Add Review

Customer Reviews 20 item(s)

Encouraging
It opens up some of the government persecution of Christians but it is not a negative book. It is encouraging to see God working in and through these people and the increasing Christian community
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 3/2/2015)
What a story!
This is the remarkable story of one man's miraculous life following God. It's a wonderful adventure of faith, marked with tragedy and suffering as well as triumph.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 7/29/2013)
One of the best Christian books I've ever read!
What an amazing story. Makes me want to live out for the Lord more boldly.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 4/7/2013)
The Christian world outside the US is much more important than what we usually acknowledge
Christian biography and autobiography is an important part of any spiritual growth. Whether you are a reader or not, you need to hear about what others have lived before you. This does not need to be in book form; movies, radio interviews, podcasts, conversations all can be part of the way that we hear from other Christians about their own spiritual lives.

Christian autobiography from non-western Christians is desperately needed to round out a vision of the church that is concerned with more than small bits of theological difference or differences in cultural engagement. Christians around the world right now are being imprisoned for their faith.

I first heard about Brother Yun (as I have about so many good books) from John Armstrong’s blog and I went back and read them as I finished up this book. It has been nearly 4 years since I first heard about the book, but I just recently got round to reading it. I should have read it much earlier.

This is a biography unlike I have read. It is reminiscent of the autobiography of Brother Andrew (the bible smuggler) I first read as a comic book as pre-teen. Brother Yun, starting when he first became a Christian at 16, was fervent in prayer. He prayed and fasted for 100 days to receive a Bible (illegal and very rare in the early 1970s in China) and after 100 days a man brought him a Bible. He did not just read it, he memorized large passages of scripture. Within months of receiving the Bible he was asked to come preach to a nearby village. He went, but did not know what to say, so he just recited the whole book of Matthew and then the parts of Acts that he had started memorizing.

His story proceeds to tell of how he became a preacher in the underground church movement of China and how he was repeatedly imprisoned, tortured and eventually escaped out of China. Brother Yun now lives in Germany with his family and works to support the church in China.

There are several main complaints that I have read about The Heavenly Man. The largest is that the book is full (and I do mean full) of miracles. There is page after page of miraculous activity. I am not actually bothered by any of this. I cannot verify any of it beyond what is in the book and beyond what others verify. For me, the issue really is not did these miracles happen (although I believe that they are most likely all true), but could the God I believe in do miracles like these if He chose. The problem with much of the criticism of the miracles in this book is that many of the critics do not seem to believe that God can do these miracles. (There is another group that believes that God can do miracles like these, but according to their reading of scripture God has chosen to no longer do miracles like these.) With either response it seems to me that we have to discount any modern miracles and I am unwilling to do that. I have seen things that I believe to be miraculous. Not to the level of seeing a prisoner miraculously walk out of prison, but the size of the miracle does not seem to really matter. Either God can or God cannot. (On the other hand, I am more skeptical about scripture miracles, not because God could not do them, but because some Christians require belief in them as part of some theological line in the sand. I believe that is placing one Christian’s interpretation above another’s Christianity and I am opposed to that.)

Another issue that I have seen is that several people object to Yun’s use of scripture. He seems to take scripture out of context and use it in ways that the original authors did not intend. To which I would refer those critics to Peter Enn’s book Inspiration and Incarnation. Yun seems to use scripture in exactly the way that many New Testament authors (and many other since) used it. I am not placing Yun on the level of an author of scripture, but merely noting that he is following in hermeneutical line with what other Christians have done for millennia.

A third issue I have seen raised is the way that the book is put together. It is intentionally written in a way that reflects the book of Acts and other scriptural stories. Yun and Hattaway intentionally are telling Yun’s story as a modern reflection of what God did in the first century. That may be overly zealous, but it is not trying to mis-represent the real things that happened, it is a story telling method. Some see it as sacrilegious or ‘proof’ that the book is not real. But that seems to say more about those reader’s understanding on communication theory than this book itself.

The last few days I have read blog post after blog post about how Christians should talk about sex (if you are unaware of the current controversies, count yourself blessed). That is important and just because Christians around the world are suffering for the sake of Christ does not mean that we should stop thinking through theological issues of our own culture. But I do think it should help us place an order of importance on those local theological issues that we spend our time and effort discussing.

I am sure I would disagree with Brother Yun about a number of theological issues. But those issues pale in comparison because I believe that he is attempting to follow God’s direction. I am not Yun’s Holy Spirit. There are many Christians that are attempting to follow God by doing things I disagree with. There are times when I believe it is appropriate to confront other Christians that are doing things that I believe are inappropriate. But Yun is a good reminder that in spite of disagreements, we are are still to submit wholly to Christ as our Lord and King. It doesn’t really matter if I am theologically right, if I am not also submitted to and following Christ.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 1/22/2012)
Am I lukewarm, or could I endure torture in the name of Jesus?
Brother Yun recounts his imprisonments, tortures and escapes in graphic detail. Although there are those who question the extent of his reported tortures, his message is clear: Jesus is love. Jesus is everything. Jesus' love is worth dying for. The way he handles his tormenters, never losing faith, is truly inspiring and heartrending.

In a country such as ours, where so many of us who call ourselves "Christian" are lukewarm at best, the mere thought of suffering torture, blood, pain and death for the sake of Jesus Christ gives pause. Would I? Could I? Or would I deny Him and hide, gradually losing what little faith I had? Not a dilemma I want to be faced with. However, Brother Yun's story causes me to question whether I am witnessing to Jesus Christ in my everyday life. Is my faith and hope contagious? Do I radiate peace and love? Good questions to keep in the front of my mind on a daily basis. In the end, don't we all want to be greeted with those precious words, "well done, good and faithful servant. Now enter in and claim your reward."? Brother Yun concludes by challenging the Western Church to return to basics. I think that's a wonderful idea.

Christopher Jean gives a compelling reading as Brother Yun, with Jeannie Park as Yun's faithful wife Deling. The readers lend warmth and truth to their characters and the audiobook is a joy to listen to.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 1/16/2012)
The Christian world outside the US is much more important than what we usually acknowledge
Christian biography and autobiography is an important part of any spiritual growth. Whether you are a reader or not, you need to hear about what others have lived before you. This does not need to be in book form, movies, radio interviews, podcasts, conversations all can be part of the way that we hear from other Christians about their own spiritual lives.

Christian autobiography from non-western Christians is desperately needed to round out a vision of the church that is concerned with more than small bits of theological difference or differences in cultural engagement. Christians around the world right now are being imprisoned for their faith.

The Heavenly Man is an interesting book. I first heard about Brother Yun (as I have about so many good books) from John Armstrong's blog and I went back and read them as I finished up this book. It has been nearly 4 years since I first heard about the book, but I just recently got round to reading it. I should have read it much earlier.

This is a biography unlike I have read. It is reminiscent of the autobiography of Brother Andrew (the bible smuggler) I read as a teen. Brother Yun starting when he first became a Christian at 16 was fervent in prayer. He prayed and fasted for 100 days to receive a bible (illegal and very rare in the early 1970s in China) and after 100 days a man brought him a bible. He did not just read it, he memorized large passages of scripture. Within months of receiving the bible he was asked to come preach to a nearby village. He went, but did not know what to say, so he just recited the whole book of Matthew and then the parts of Acts that he had started memorizing.

His story proceeds to tell of how he became a preacher in the underground church movement of China and how he was repeatedly imprisoned, tortured and eventually escaped out of China. Brother Yun now lives in Germany with his family and works to support the church in China.

There are several main complaints that I have read about it. The largest is that the book is full (and I do mean full) of miracles. There is page after page of miraculous activity. I am not actually bothered by any of this. I cannot verify any of it beyond what is in the book and beyond what others verify. For me, the issue really is not did these miracles happen (although I believe that they are most likely all true), but could the God I believe in do miracles like these if He chose. The problem with much of the criticism of the miracles in this book is that many of the critics do not seem to believe that God can do these miracles. (There is another group that believes that God can do miracles like these, but according to their reading of scripture God has chosen to no longer do miracles like these.) With either response it seems to me that we have to discount any modern miracles and I am unwilling to do that. I have seen things that I believe to be miraculous. Not to the level of seeing a prisoner miraculously walk out of prison, but the size of the miracle does not seem to really matter. Either God can or God cannot. (On the other hand, I am more skeptical about scripture miracles, not because God could not do them, but because some Christians require belief in them as part of some theological line in the sand. I believe that is placing one Christian's interpretation above another's Christianity and I am opposed to that.)

Another issue that I have seen is that several people object to Yun's use of scripture. He seems to take scripture out of context and use it in ways that the original authors did not intend. To which I would refer those critics to Peter Enn's book Inspiration and Incarnation. Yun seems to use scripture in exactly the way that many New Testament authors used it. I am not placing Yun on the level of an author of scripture, but merely noting that he is following in hermeneutical line with what other Christians have done for millennia.

A third issue I have seen raised is the way that the book is put together. It is intentionally written in a way that reflects the book of Acts and other scriptural stories. Yun and Hattaway intentionally are telling Yun's story as a modern reflection of what God did in the first century. That may be overly zealous, but it is not trying to mis-represent the real things that happened, it is a story telling method.

The last few days I have read blog post after blog post about how Christians should talk about sex (if you are unaware, count yourself blessed). That is important and just because Christians around the world are suffering for the sake of Christ does not mean that we should stop thinking through theological issues of our own culture. But I do think it should help us place an order of importance on those local theological issues that we spend out time and effort discussing.

I am sure I would disagree with Brother Yun about a number of theological issues. But those issues pale in comparison because I believe that he is attempting to follow God's direction. I am not Yun's Holy Spirit. There are many Christians that are attempting to follow God by doing things I disagree with. Yun is a good reminder that in spite of disagreements are are still to submit wholly to Christ as our Lord and King. It doesn't really matter if I am theologically right, if I am not also submitted and following Christ.
_____
I was provided a copy of the audiobook for purposes of review, this review was originally published on my blog http://bookwi.se
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 1/10/2012)
AMAZING
I absolutely loved this audio book. The story was second to none and the narrorator was awesome! I didn't want it to end! Brother Yun is my boy!
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 1/6/2012)
life-changing
Gotta say that I will never be the same again. Inspiring and challenging, Yun's walk merits contemplation and meditation as to understanding the ways of God and my own allegiance to Jesus. At what cost am I willing to function? Even my kids, on our commute to/from their school, requested to listen to this day after day, as it is inspiring them to consider what it means to follow Jesus. This book will break you in so many ways...praise God.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 12/17/2011)
Amazing Story
The Heavenly Man by Brother Yun is a fascinating look into the life of a Chinese Christian as he attempts to disciple others and bring the Gospel to his fellow people. Brother Yun gets thrown in prison countless times, the last time miraculously escaping by walking out the the front gate, and then escaping out of the country. Many people told him he should leave the country, but he chose to stay to bring the Gospel to his people. There's a lot in this book I may be skeptical about as it tends to border on Pentacostal/Charismatic dreams/visions, and a bit of it almost seems as if it's lifted right out of the book of Acts and placed in a modern-day context. Seeing what I have seen in my many trips around the world, however, dreams and visions can be common place, and yet we must line them up with Scripture. Brother Yun's sole purpose was to always bring glory to God and share the Gospel with everyone, despite the protests of his government. I still remain skeptical of some parts of the story.

This being an audiobook on MP3, the sound was good and the narration was well done. The narration was performed by two different readers, switching off between Brother Yun's point of view and his wife's point of view. It made it feel more as if you were there.

Publisher's description:
You've seen the headlines - government crackdowns on Chinese house churches; mass arrests and human rights violations...But this intensely dramatic autobiography makes it real! Learn how God took a young half-starved boy from Henan Province and enabled him to stand strong on the front lines for Jesus, braving horrific opposition and impossible odds.
This audiobook was provided free from Christianaudio.com in exchange for an unbiased review.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 12/13/2011)
Excellent - a must read/listen
Just finished listening to this. What an inspiration, challenge and encouragement. I realise again how slanted, selfish, independent our faith can become in our Western world - and books like this are a gift from God to have a full view of the gospel & His Kingdom.
Thank you!!
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 12/6/2011)
An amazing book
I need to start out by say that I personally know Paul Hattaway, the co-author of this book, as a godly brother and devoted servant of God. (I met him while living in China in the early 90s.) Unfortunately, the reviewer who compared Brother Yun to Jones, Moon and Koresh is just repeating the Chinese government line and the other false rumors circulating about Yun. Read or listen to this book yourself and you will be able to discern the truth about this man.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 11/28/2011)
A Phenomanal Book
This book has blessed me greatly. It has challenged me and left me amazed and thankful at the same time crying my eyes out!! Thank You, Heavenly Father, for this amazing man's life and testimony. Amen
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 11/14/2011)
A must read for all that call themselves followers of Christ
The mixture of narration on this book is I believe excellent giving a balanced view of not only what Brother Yun has been through but also his family.

More than that which I believe Brother Yun would like the listeners/ readers to come away with is another view to what others face in their walk with God.

Being born and brought up in England I cannot even begin to understand the pain an suffering he went through but am inspired by his faith and endurance in his journey. I am also stirred to want to go another level for God. Bibles are a rarity in China and we in the West have the luxary of not only having one bible but bibles of many different versions and yet many of us are lacking in the spiritual food Brother Yun refers to in his book. Quite a sobering thought.

There are a multitude of messages and teachings that one can get from this book if one comes with an open mind.

God Bless you Brother Yun and your family
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 11/8/2011)
Inspiring and Stirring
I enjoyed this audio book and am really greatful for the free download.This audio book stirred my heart to continue believing in God.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 11/8/2011)
distorted view of Christianity in China
I would be very careful of this book/audio. Even though it recieved a "Christian book award", it presents a HIGHLY slanted (distorted) view of Chrisitainity in China that does not represent reality. Brother Yun participates in an aberrant form of Christianity which in no way would be considered to have orthodoxy or orthography. Imagine a book about Jim Jones, Sun Myung Moon or David Koresh being portrayed as being unfairly "persecuted Christians" and you have this book.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 11/2/2011)
get the print edition...
This book contains excellent tales. It revolves around the life of Brother Yun, from childhood to adulthood, and his missionary efforts in his homeland of China. The tales that readers find in the book are simply unbelievable. Unbelievable, that is, if you don't have an open mind to the power of G-d and His active involvement in our lives today. If you don't, you won't enjoy the book, nor this audio narration of it, so feel free to move on. But if you do, then I solidly recommend the print edition over the audio edition.

While three narrators gave it an excellent attempt, I have read most of the book before, and found that the narration did not give the text the life of the supernatural words that bind this work. After listening to all three narrators, I am quite convinced that they all sound quite mechanical in their intonation, matching the text-to-speech function from early computer models. Even Siri's voice is much improved over this. Overall, this is an audio book that I'm glad I have the print edition to. The material is worth it, but the narration is not.

The Score:
+4 for missionary inspiration
+3 for truthfulness
+2 for China (they need all the points they can get)
-5 for monotone/computerized reading
= +4.

This review is part of the CA Reviewers program. Find this review, and others like it, at scriptedgenius.com.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 11/1/2011)
Uncomfortable Listening
This was definitely not an easy listen and at times extremely unpleasant. I actually read this book when it first came out in print years ago and I really enjoyed it and found Brother Yun’s accounts very exciting and inspiring.

Listening to this many years later I’ve not enjoyed it half as much. I think what I find really hard about it is the great suffering the author has experienced as a result of preaching the Gospel in China. At times he made it sound like God was torturing him to improve his character.

The quality of this audio is excellent and the narrators come across very well. I enjoyed Jeany Park’s narration of Yun’s wife far more than Christoper Jean as the voice of Yun. Her voice was more natural and soft against what I found to be an arrogant edge to the voice of Christopher Jean. Though this is perhaps more to do with the way it is written, rather the narrator’s voice.

Thanks to christianaudio.com Reviewer’s Program for the free copy.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 10/31/2011)
What a challenge!
The Heavenly Man is the autobiography of Liu Zhenying (also known as Brother Yun), a Chinese missionary who began to spread the gospel at the age of 16, in the 1960's. From the beginning of Brother Yun's ministry, we see God's hand directing his every step. His was not an easy life, but he determined not to be stopped by threats, arrests, or torture. This level of commitment led to some remarkable miracles in his life. What a challenge to all of us!

I thought the narrator was perfect for this book. His English was a little stilted, which made me feel like the author himself was telling us his story. The mention of so many places and historical events made me want to look up maps and timelines, and I ended up learning a lot about how this part of the world evolved in their views on religion. Although I had to cringe and pause the listening during some of the more difficult passages, this was a story I really enjoyed listening to and easily found myself engrossed in.

This is a must-read for missionaries, and something that every Christian on the planet could benefit from reading. I learned a lot about devotion, evangelism, and loving my neighbor enough to risk my life so that he can hear the Gospel.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this audiobook free from the publisher through ChristianAudio.com's book review program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 10/29/2011)
One of my favorite of all...
One of my favorite of all time. All American Christians should listen to or read this book!
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 8/12/2009)
A great book, experiences that will...
A great book, experiences that will amaze you, highly recommended.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 11/30/2008)