Worldview

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  1. The Vocation of Knowledge: Higher Education and the Difference Christ Makes

    The Vocation of Knowledge: Higher Education and the Difference Christ Makes

    Book 8

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.3 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $5.98 Member Price: $4.78 (or 1 credit)
    Regular Price: $5.98 Member Price: $4.78 (or 1 credit)
    Mark Noll (The Future of Christian Learning) describes why serious Christian learning requires a confidence that the Gospel has broad social and intellectual consequences. Norman Klassen and Jens Zimmermann (The Passionate Intellect: Incarnational Humanism and the Future of University Education) explain why the term "Christian humanism" is especially apt in describing the aims of Christian higher education. James K. A. Smith (Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation) develops the idea that education is more about formation than information, and that we are formed by our participation in liturgies, whether at church or at the mall.
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  2. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 116

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 116

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.65 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 116: Stratford Caldecott, on why education should be designed with a deep and wide understanding of human nature and must sustain the unity of knowledge; Fred Bahnson, on how a Christian understanding of God's redemptive work on the earth should influence our practices of growing and sharing food; Eric O. Jacobsen, on how modernism distorted the shape of cities and how Christian reflection on the nature of neighborliness can help restore them; J. Budziszewski, on how meaning in human life transcends a merely biological explanation of our behavior; Brian Brock, on the various ways in which the Church has regarded its obligation to welcome the disabled; and Allen Verhey, on the difference between a "medicalized" death and a death experienced in light of God's cosmic work of redemption.
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  3. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 120

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 120

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 2.15 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 120: Douglas Rushkoff, on the experience of “present shock” and the consequent loss of belief in the capability of stories to convey the shape of reality to us; Phillip Thompson, on Thomas Merton's lifelong concern about the disorienting effects of the technological mindset; Jonathan Wilson, on how the life of the Trinity—a life of interpersonal giving and receiving—is the model of life within Creation, calling us to lives of generosity; James Bratt, on the life and thought of Abraham Kuyper, and on some of his early influences; D.C. Schindler, on how consciousness and reason are “ecstatic,” and necessarily involve reaching outside of ourselves; and Paul Elie, on how access to recordings enables a deeper understanding of music, and how the experience of Bach's music benefits from such depth.
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  4. Man, Myth, Messiah

    Man, Myth, Messiah

    Answering History's Greatest Question

    Author: Rice Broocks
    Narrator: Tommy Cresswell
    Runtime: 7.68 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $18.99 Member Price: $15.19 (or 3 credits)
    Regular Price: $18.99 Member Price: $15.19 (or 3 credits)
    Did Jesus Really Exist? The search for the historical Jesus continues to be headline news. Any speculative theory seems to get instant attention as the debate rages about His real identity and the claims made in His name. Did Jesus really exist? Is there real historical evidence that demonstrates that He lived and actually said and did the things the Gospels record? Is there any validity to the speculative claims that the Jesus story was a myth, borrowed from a variety of pagan cultures of the ancient world? In this follow-up to the book God’s Not Dead (that inspired the movie), Man, Myth, Messiah looks at the evidence for the historical Jesus and exposes the notions of skeptics that Jesus was a contrived figure of ancient mythology. It also looks at the reliability of the Gospel records as well as the evidence for the resurrection that validates His identity as the promised Messiah. Man, Myth, Messiah will be released concurrent to the God’s Not Dead movie sequel, which will cover the same theme.
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  5. The Armageddon Code

    The Armageddon Code

    One Journalist's Quest for End-Times Answers

    Narrator: Adam Verner
    Runtime: 7.1 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $14.98 Member Price: $11.98 (or 3 credits)
    Regular Price: $14.98 Member Price: $11.98 (or 3 credits)
    Through a thought-provoking, journalistic voice, Billy Hallowell, faith editor for theblaze.com, provides objective one-on-one interviews with various leading voices in Christian ministry to explain what they believe the Bible teaches us about the last days. From its easy-to-understand writing style to its glossary of terms and other helpful tools, everything about this book was created to allow you to educate yourself on what the Bible says, compare what the experts believe, and draw your own conclusions about the end times.,
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  6. Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 110-114

    Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 110-114

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Guests on Volume 110: Kevin Belmonte, on how G. K. Chesterton embraced a "defiant joy" in spite of the cynical pessimism of many of his contemporaries; David Lyle Jeffrey & Gregory Maillet, on why Christians cannot afford to regard literature as a mere entertaining diversion; Mark Noll, on what motivates anti-intellectualism among Christians and why it is a theologically indefensible prejudice; Alan Jacobs, on W. H. Auden's understanding of the vocation of "poet" and on the spiritual and historical background to Auden's 1947 book-length poem, The Age of Anxiety; and Jonathan Chaplin, on the outlines and sources of the social and political thought of Herman Dooyeweerd and on his understanding of the relationship between theology and Christian philosophy. Guests on Volume 111: Siva Vaidhyanathan, on why trusting Google to organize the world's knowledge is an odd (and dangerous) thing to do; John Fea, on the history of the idea of America as a Christian nation and on how the Founders were—as statesmen—less interested in the truth of religion than in its political utility; Ross Douthat, on how commitment to historical Christian orthodoxy has eroded among American religious institutions since the 1960s; Ian Ker, on why G. K. Chesterton deserves wider recognition as a significant literary critic; Larry Woiwode, on how his decision to become a writer grew out of a desire to make connections with other people; and Dana Gioia, on the remarkable life of poet John Donne and how his spiritual and intellectual struggles created the conditions for his unique poetic voice. Guests on Volume 112: Christian Smith, on why "emerging adults" feel compelled to keep all their options open, in life and in thought; David Schindler, on how modern liberalism fails to acknowledge the reality of God's love in the order of Creation; Sara Anson Vaux, on the moral vision of director Clint Eastwood; Melvyn Bragg, on the origins and profound cultural influence of the King James Bible; Timothy Larsen, on how Victorians were united in their preoccupation with the Bible, whether or not they believed in God; and Ralph C. Wood, on the sacramental vision of G. K. Chesterton, and on the enigmatic message of The Man Who Was Thursday. Guests on Volume 113: Steven Shapin, on whether or not there is a single thing called "science," and whether scientists are united by a single "scientific method"; Arthur Boers, on why the ways in which technologies shape our lives should be recognized as spiritual and pastoral challenges; Christine Pohl, on why a deliberate commitment to certain shared practices is necessary for the sustaining of community; Norman Wirzba, on how attentiveness to our eating and our care of the land are central aspects of culture and of godly faith; Craig Bartholomew, on carelessness concerning embodied experience and our "crisis of place"; and David I. Smith, on how the forms of pedagogical practices ought to be crafted to correspond to the content of teaching. Guests on Volume 114: Susan Cain, on how the 20th-century displacement of character by "personality" encouraged Americans to sell themselves (and marginalized introverts); Brad S. Gregory, on the danger of assuming that previous epochs of history have no lasting influence, and how unintended consequences of the Reformation shrunk Christian cultural influence; David Sehat, on why the story of religious liberty in America is more complicated than is often acknowledged; Augustine Thompson, O.P., on the myths and realities of St. Francis of Assisi; Gerald R. McDermott, on how love and beauty are more fundamental in the thought of Jonathan Edwards than the image of an angry God; and Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, on lessons inThe Scarlet Letter about wise ways of reading complex texts.
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  7. Short Stories

    Short Stories

    Author: C.S. Lewis
    Narrator: Ralph Cosham
    Runtime: 5 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $9.95 Member Price: $7.96 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $9.95 Member Price: $7.96 (or 2 credits)
    This volume of short essays and other pieces by C. S. Lewis is part of a larger collection, C. S. Lewis: Essay Collection and Other Short Pieces. In addition to his many books, letters, and poems, C. S. Lewis wrote a great number of essays and shorter pieces on various subjects. He wrote extensively on Christian theology and the defense of faith but also on ethical issues and the nature of literature and storytelling. Within these pages is a treasure trove of Lewis’ reflections on diverse topics. This volume includes: 1. The Man Born Blind 2. The Dark Tower 3. Ministering Angels 4. The Shoddy Lands 5. After Ten Years 6. Forms of Things Unknown
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  8. Maker of Middle-Earth

    Maker of Middle-Earth

    Conversation 17

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.25 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $5.98 Member Price: $4.78 (or 1 credit)
    Regular Price: $5.98 Member Price: $4.78 (or 1 credit)
    While it is not a story set in the twentieth century, Tom Shippey (author of J.R.R. Tolkien: Author of the Century) claims that Lord of the Rings is very much a work of the twentieth century; the momentum of evil sweeps characters into action before they understand the events in which they are involved. Joseph Pearce (author of Tolkien: Man and Myth) defends the Lord of the Rings fantasy genre against those who would claim that realistic fiction is a better vessel for truth; because mythology is stripped of the factual, he explains, it can deal with truth unencumbered and therefore convey its moral more directly. Literary critic Ralph Wood explains why he has been drawn to J.R.R. Tolkien's moral Middle-Earth since his first reading of Lord of the Rings in the 1960s. It is a world ordered by heroism, friendship, loyalty, and hope. These ties alone, he states, enable the hobbits to complete their quest and go where no one else can.
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  9. We Are Charleston

    We Are Charleston

    Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel

    Narrator: Barry Scott
    Runtime: 8.63 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $21.99 Member Price: $17.59 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $21.99 Member Price: $17.59 (or 4 credits)
    On June 17, 2015, at 9:05 p.m., a young man with a handgun opened fire on a prayer meeting at the Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church in Charleston, South Carolina, killing nine members of the congregation. The captured shooter, twenty-one-year-old Dylan Roof, a white supremacist, was charged with their murders. Two days after the shooting, while Roof’s court hearing was held on video conference, the families of his nine victims, one by one, appeared on the screen—forgiving the killer. The “Emanuel Nine” set a profound example for their families, their city, their nation, and indeed the world. We Are Charleston not only recounts the events of that terrible day but also offers a history lesson that reveals a deeper look at the suffering, triumph, and even the ongoing rage of the people who formed Mother Emanuel A.M.E. church and the wider denominational movement. In many ways, this church’s story is America’s story—the oldest A.M.E. church in the Deep South fighting for freedom and civil rights but also fighting for grace and understanding. Fighting to transcend bigotry, fraud, hatred, racism, poverty, and misery. The shootings in June 2015, opened up a deep wound of racism that still permeates Southern institutions and remains part of American society. We Are Charleston tells the story of a people, continually beaten down, who seem to continually triumph over the worst of adversity. Exploring the storied history of the A.M.E. Church may be a way of explaining the price and power of forgiveness, a way of revealing God’s mercy in the midst of tremendous pain. We Are Charleston may help us discover what can be right in a world that so often has gone wrong.
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