Worldview

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  1. No God but One: Allah or Jesus?

    No God but One: Allah or Jesus?

    A Former Muslim Investigates the Evidence for Islam and Christianity

    Narrator: Nabeel Qureshi
    Runtime: 6.3 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $24.99 Member Price: $24.99 (or 6 credits)
    Regular Price: $24.99 Member Price: $24.99 (or 6 credits)
    Having shared his journey of faith in the New York Times bestselling Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus, Nabeel Qureshi now examines Islam and Christianity in detail, exploring areas of crucial conflict and unpacking the relevant evidence. In this anticipated follow-up book, Nabeel reveals what he discovered in the decade following his conversion, providing a thorough and careful comparison of the evidence for Islam and Christianity--evidence that wrenched his heart and transformed his life. In Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus, Nabeel Qureshi recounted his dramatic journey, describing his departure from Islam and his decision to follow Christ. In the years that followed, he realized that the world’s two largest religions are far more different than they initially appeared. No God but One: Allah or Jesus? addresses the most important questions at the interface of Islam and Christianity: How do the two religions differ? Are the differences significant? Can we be confident that either Christianity or Islam is true? And most important, is it worth sacrificing everything for the truth? Nabeel shares stories from his life and ministry, casts new light on current events, and explores pivotal incidents in the histories of both religions, providing a resource that is gripping and thought-provoking, respectful and challenging. Both Islam and Christianity teach that there is No God but One, but who deserves to be worshiped, Allah or Jesus?
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  2. Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 110-114

    Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 110-114

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Guests on Volume 110: Kevin Belmonte, on how G. K. Chesterton embraced a "defiant joy" in spite of the cynical pessimism of many of his contemporaries; David Lyle Jeffrey & Gregory Maillet, on why Christians cannot afford to regard literature as a mere entertaining diversion; Mark Noll, on what motivates anti-intellectualism among Christians and why it is a theologically indefensible prejudice; Alan Jacobs, on W. H. Auden's understanding of the vocation of "poet" and on the spiritual and historical background to Auden's 1947 book-length poem, The Age of Anxiety; and Jonathan Chaplin, on the outlines and sources of the social and political thought of Herman Dooyeweerd and on his understanding of the relationship between theology and Christian philosophy. Guests on Volume 111: Siva Vaidhyanathan, on why trusting Google to organize the world's knowledge is an odd (and dangerous) thing to do; John Fea, on the history of the idea of America as a Christian nation and on how the Founders were—as statesmen—less interested in the truth of religion than in its political utility; Ross Douthat, on how commitment to historical Christian orthodoxy has eroded among American religious institutions since the 1960s; Ian Ker, on why G. K. Chesterton deserves wider recognition as a significant literary critic; Larry Woiwode, on how his decision to become a writer grew out of a desire to make connections with other people; and Dana Gioia, on the remarkable life of poet John Donne and how his spiritual and intellectual struggles created the conditions for his unique poetic voice. Guests on Volume 112: Christian Smith, on why "emerging adults" feel compelled to keep all their options open, in life and in thought; David Schindler, on how modern liberalism fails to acknowledge the reality of God's love in the order of Creation; Sara Anson Vaux, on the moral vision of director Clint Eastwood; Melvyn Bragg, on the origins and profound cultural influence of the King James Bible; Timothy Larsen, on how Victorians were united in their preoccupation with the Bible, whether or not they believed in God; and Ralph C. Wood, on the sacramental vision of G. K. Chesterton, and on the enigmatic message of The Man Who Was Thursday. Guests on Volume 113: Steven Shapin, on whether or not there is a single thing called "science," and whether scientists are united by a single "scientific method"; Arthur Boers, on why the ways in which technologies shape our lives should be recognized as spiritual and pastoral challenges; Christine Pohl, on why a deliberate commitment to certain shared practices is necessary for the sustaining of community; Norman Wirzba, on how attentiveness to our eating and our care of the land are central aspects of culture and of godly faith; Craig Bartholomew, on carelessness concerning embodied experience and our "crisis of place"; and David I. Smith, on how the forms of pedagogical practices ought to be crafted to correspond to the content of teaching. Guests on Volume 114: Susan Cain, on how the 20th-century displacement of character by "personality" encouraged Americans to sell themselves (and marginalized introverts); Brad S. Gregory, on the danger of assuming that previous epochs of history have no lasting influence, and how unintended consequences of the Reformation shrunk Christian cultural influence; David Sehat, on why the story of religious liberty in America is more complicated than is often acknowledged; Augustine Thompson, O.P., on the myths and realities of St. Francis of Assisi; Gerald R. McDermott, on how love and beauty are more fundamental in the thought of Jonathan Edwards than the image of an angry God; and Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, on lessons inThe Scarlet Letter about wise ways of reading complex texts.
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  3. God and Government

    God and Government

    An Insider's View on the Boundaries between Faith and Politics

    Narrator: Grover Gardner
    Runtime: 15.65 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $27.99 Member Price: $22.39 (or 5 credits)
    Regular Price: $27.99 Member Price: $22.39 (or 5 credits)
    How should Christians live their faith in the public arena? This updated edition of Charles Colson’s blockbuster Kingdoms in Conflict includes a new foreword, new stories and recent court cases in place of older examples, and a revised opening that depicts today’s current international climate marked by terrorism and the conflict with radical Islam.
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  4. The Dawn of Christianity

    The Dawn of Christianity

    How God Used Simple Fishermen, Soldiers, and Prostitutes to Transform the World

    Narrator: Bill Russell
    Runtime: 8.5 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $21.99 Member Price: $17.59 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $21.99 Member Price: $17.59 (or 4 credits)
    Drawing upon the most recent discoveries and scholarship in archaeology and the first-century Near East, The Dawn of Christianity reveals how a beleaguered group of followers of a crucified rabbi became the founders of a world-changing faith. How did Christianity truly come to be? Where did this worldwide faith come from? The Dawn of Christianity tells the story of how the first followers of Jesus survived the terror and despair of witnessing the one they knew to be the messiah—God’s agent for the salvation of the world—suddenly arrested, tried, and executed. Soon after Jesus’ death, his relatives and closest followers began hearing reports that Jesus was alive again—reports that even his most loyal disciples at first refused to believe.  Using the most recent studies by top Christian and secular scholars, Robert Hutchinson, known for his popular books on Christianity and Biblical Studies, reconstructs all of the known accounts of these early resurrection appearances and follows the witnesses to the resurrection as they experience brutal persecution at the hands of zealots such as Saul of Tarsus and then become committed evangelists to the major population centers in Antioch, Damascus, Rome, and Athens—and ultimately across the world. A riveting thriller of the most improbable history-changing movement imaginable, The Dawn of Christianity brings to life the compelling story of the birth of Christianity.
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  5. Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 75-79

    Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 75-79

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Regular Price: $23.99 Member Price: $19.19 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $23.99 Member Price: $19.19 (or 4 credits)
    Guests on Volume 75: Mark Malvasi, on John Lukacs, the meaning of the modern, and how to think about history; John Lukacs, on the roles of curiosity and language in the vocation of historians; Steve Talbott, on how communications technologies divert language from its richest possibilities; Christian Smith, on the spiritual lives and theological assumptions of American teenagers; Eugene Peterson, on the essential relationship between theology and spirituality, and on the narrative life of congregations; and Rolland Hein, on the life and imagination of George MacDonald. Guests on Volume 76: D. H. Williams, on the Church's rootedness in its Tradition, why some Protestants remain suspicious, and on the excluding character of Christian conversion; Catherine Edwards Sanders, on the spiritual hunger behind the rise of modern witchcraft; Ted Prescott, on changing images of beauty and the human figure in 20th century art; Martin X. Moleski, on the life, times, and remarkable insights of Michael Polanyi; Stephen Prickett, on George MacDonald and the tasks of imagination; and Barrett Fisher, on the relative artistic assets of film and literature. Guests on Volume 77: Eric Miller, on the conserving radicalism and revolutionary traditionalism of Christopher Lasch; Lisa de Boer, on the depiction of everyday humanity in northern European post-Renaissance painting; Peter J. Schakel, on seeing The Chronicles of Narnia as fairy tales, not just Christian allegory; and Alan Jacobs, on how The Chronicles of Narnia reveal much of C. S. Lewis's thinking on almost everything, and on how Lewis's imagination was prepared to write such books. Guests on Volume 78: Mark Bauerlein, on the causes of disengagement of college students from concern for intellectual and civic life; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, on television, children, and acquiring a sense of reality; Sam Van Eman, on the view of the good life advanced by advertising; Thomas de Zengotita, on Mediated: How the Media Shapes Your World and the Way You Live in It, and on postmodern individualism and "reality" TV; Eugene McCarraher, on how American management theory became an influential source of religious meaning and practice; and John Witte, Jr., on how law embodies a view of human nature, and why religious viewpoints have often been ignored. Guests on Volume 79: Carson Holloway, on why sociobiology and evolutionary psychology are inadequate bases for sustaining political ideals; Peter Augustine Lawler, on why we are more than "individuals" narrowly defined; Hadley Arkes, on the difference, in law, between evidence from social scientific data and moral truths; Ben Witherington, III, on why The Da Vinci Code's implausible account of history seems credible to many people; Christopher Shannon, on Ivan Illich (Medical Nemesis) and the loss of belief in the possibility that suffering can be meaningful; Roger Lundin, on how nature and experience replaced revelation as a source of authority (and why they fail to serve as such), and on the necessity of humility in writing biographies.
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  6. Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 100-104

    Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 100-104

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Guests on Volume 100: Jennifer Burns, on the life and legacy of Ayn Rand, "goddess of the market" and entrenched enemy of altruism; Christian Smith, on the aimless cultural world of "emerging adulthood" and on how it makes the idea of objective moral order implausible; and Dallas Willard, on why it's important to recover the conviction that religious beliefs involve real knowledge. In honor of the five score milestone, part two of the issue features a look back at the beginnings of the Journal and a few special excerpts of conversations with those early guests, including Peter Kreeft on Lewis, Huxley, and J.F.K. after death; P. D. James, on good and evil in fiction; James Davison Hunter, on culture wars; Paul McHugh, on when psychiatry loses its way; Ted Prescott, on nudity in art and advertising; Ed Knippers, on the powerful presence of the body; Martha Bayles, on pop and perverse modernism; Dominic Aquila, on Christopher Lasch; Gilbert Meilaender, on random kindness; Neil Postman, on technology and culture; and Alan Jacobs, on being maudlin in Madison County. Guests on Volume 101: James Davison Hunter, on how the most prominent strategies of Christian cultural engagement are based on a misunderstanding about how cultures work; Paul Spears, on why Christian scholars need to understand their disciplines in ways that depart from conventional understanding; Steven Loomis, on why education needs to attend more carefully to nonquantifiable aspects of human experience; James K. A. Smith, on how education always involves the formation of affections and how the form of Christian education should imitate patterns of formation evident in historic Christian liturgy; Thomas Long, on how funeral practices have the capacity to convey an understanding of the meaning of discipleship and death; and William T. Cavanaugh, on the distinctly modern definition of "religion" and how the conventional account of the "Wars of Religion" misrepresents the facts in the interest of consolidating state power. Guests on Volume 102: Daniel M. Bell, Jr., on recovering the view that the just war tradition is more about the shaping of character and virtue than a checklist for political leaders; Lew Daly, on how the discussion concerning faith-based initiatives raised larger issues about the identity of social groups in American society; Adam K. Webb, on whether the traditional personal and communal virtues in premodern village life must be abandoned for poverty to be alleviated; Stratford Caldecott, on how denying the reality of beauty is linked to a denial of the coherent meaning of Creation; James Matthew Wilson, on Jacques Maritain's pilgrimage to faith and his subsequent development of a rich philosophy of beauty; and Thomas Hibbs, on the similar projects of painters Georges Rouault (1871-1958) and Makoto Fujimura (b. 1960), and how they each resisted various confusions in modern art. Guests on Volume 103: Steven D. Smith, on how the law only makes sense in the context of certain metaphysical beliefs, and on why we aren't allowed to talk about such things in public; David Thomson, on the American Dream, acting, loneliness, the moral complicity of movie audiences, and the genius of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho; Adam McHugh, on how American culture distrusts introverts and on why their place in the Church needs to be valued; Glenn C. Arbery, on the Vanderbilt Agrarians, poetry, and the moral imagination and the shaping of virtue; Eric Miller, on Christopher Lasch's intense commitment to understand the logic of American cultural confusion; and Eric Metaxas, on how Dietrich Bonhoeffer's early experiences prepared him for his heroic defiance of the Third Reich. Guests on Volume 104: James Le Fanu, on the mistaken assumption that modern medical science has eliminated the fittingness of a sense of mystery and wonder at the human mind and body; Garret Keizer, on how many noises in modern life reveal a state of warfare with the limitations of our embodiment; Daniel Ritchie, on how Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) and Isaac Watts (1674-1748) anticipated late twentieth-century critiques of the Enlightenment; Monica Ganas, on how the distinct vision of life embedded in "California-ism" has exerted a powerful cultural influence; Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, on how the search for faithfulness to Christ led him to the wisdom of the Benedictine Rule and a "new monasticism"; and Peter J. Leithart, on why Constantine has an unfairly bad reputation and on how his rule dealt a severe blow to paganism in the West.
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  7. Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 90-94

    Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 90-94

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Guests on Volume 90: J. Mark Bertrand, on how the language of "worldviews" can mean something richer than it often does; Michael P. Schutt, on how the day-to-day practice of Christian lawyers can reflect a Christian view of the nature of law; Michael Ward, on how C. S. Lewis'sChronicles of Narnia were shaped by medieval cosmological beliefs about the seven planets; Dana Gioia, on the disturbing trends in the reading (non)habits of Americans; Makoto Fujimura, on reading, painting, and attending to the world; Gregory Edward Reynolds, on lessons about reading from the study of media ecology; Catherine Prescott, on why portrait painters often depict their subjects with books in their hands; and Eugene Peterson, on the place of reading in the spiritual lives of Christians. Guests on Volume 91: John Witte, Jr., on the life and work of legal historian Harold Berman and on the revolutionary changes throughout the history of law in the West; Hugh Brogan, on Alexis de Tocqueville’s understanding of democracy, equality, liberty, free association, social status, and the dangers of centralized government; Daniel Ritchie, on Tocqueville’s analysis of the dangers of individualism (and how they might be avoided); Daniel Walker Howe, on the confidence in progress and Providence in early 19th-century America; George McKenna, on how the Puritan understanding of God’s purposes in history shaped American political culture; and Patrick Deneen, on the differences between Aristotelian and modern political philosophy and on how Wendell Berry’s thought demonstrates his identity as a "Kentucky Aristotelian." Guests on Volume 92: Jake Halpern, on the ecosystem of celebrity and the complicated reasons why people seek to become famous; Stephen J. Nichols, on how the dynamics of American culture have shaped our understanding of who Jesus is; Richard M. Gamble, on resources for and the outlines of a theology of education; Peter J. Leithart, on how concerns from some postmodern thinkers echo the eschatological perspective of Solomon (as presented in the book of Ecclesiastes); Bill Vitek, on how wise living on the Earth requires the humble recognition of our ignorance as well as the application of knowledge; and Craig Holdrege, on lessons from Goethe about how we understand the rest of Creation as participants, not detached and potentially omniscient observers, and also on the "conversational" quality of our engagement with Creation. Guests on Volume 93: Alan Jacobs, on practical consequences of belief in original sin (and the five distinct components of that belief); James A. Herrick, on redemptive myths advanced by science fiction and speculative science and on evolution as a religion; J. Daryl Charles, on the commitment by the magisterial Reformers to the idea of natural law; Robert C. Roberts, on the role of emotions in ethical and spiritual life; Allan C. Carlson, on how the industrial revolution changed the shape of households (including their floorplans) and the understanding of marriage; and Sheila O'Connor-Ambrose, on the work of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese in defending marriage against the various claims of individualism. Guests on Volume 94: Maggie Jackson, on how multitasking exalts efficiency and promises the overcoming of bodily limitations as time is restructured and on the importance of attentiveness in sustaining personal and social order; Mark Bauerlein, on how technologies have rearranged the social lives of teens (and their expectations of education); Tim Clydesdale, on what the first year in college means for teens; Andy Crouch, on the physical basis of cultural life and how "culture making" is done; and Jeremy Begbie, on how music is a way of engaging with the order in Creation and on how writing and hearing music involves a recognition of likenesses in Creation and the exercise of "hyper-hearing."
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  8. Is This the End?

    Is This the End?

    Signs of God's Providence in a Disturbing New World

    Narrator: Tommy Cresswell
    Runtime: 9.10 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $24.99 Member Price: $19.99 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $24.99 Member Price: $19.99 (or 4 credits)
    The world seems more fractured each day. People are asking, "Is this the End?" Never have the headlines been this jarring, the cultural changes this rapid, or the moral decay this pronounced. What on earth is happening? After each new occurrence, the most oft-heard questions are, “Will the world ever be the same again?” and “Where is God in all of this?” Over the last few decades, Dr. David Jeremiah has become one of the world’s most sought-after Christian leaders on topics that deal with biblical application and modern culture. And few would dispute that the pace at which things are currently changing is unprecedented. The time has come to accept this new normal, Jeremiah says, and understand how God’s hand is still at work on His eternal plan for mankind. No one can afford to ignore these warnings, but all can better understand the greater story and the role we each play in this changing world. From prophetic clues in Scripture to an understanding of the power of Christ in all believers, this book directs us on a clear path forward. The book is split into two sections, each covering items surrounding two important questions. Is This the End of America? and Is This the End of the World? Includes detailed chapters on: Terrorism ISIS and Radicalized Islam The New Russia The Bleeding of America's Borders The "Anything Goes" Society Polarization and Divisiveness The Coming of Christ and many more
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  9. Clara Barton (Heroes of History)

    Clara Barton (Heroes of History)

    Courage Under Fire

    Runtime: 4.87 Hrs - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $21.99 Member Price: $17.59 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $21.99 Member Price: $17.59 (or 4 credits)
    Clara pushed herself to work faster. She had to get the wounded soldiers onto the train before the Confederates came over the hill. A messenger galloped up just as the last man was loaded aboard. "You have to go now!" he shouted. "The enemy is breaking over the hills. If the train is stopped, you will have to escape across country!" Known during the Civil War as the "Angel of the Battlefield," remarkable Clara Barton risked everything to save countless lives on the front lines of battle. Once a painfully timid child, Clara was as bold as a lion when it came to helping others, whether wayward schoolboys, natural-disaster victims, or dying soldiers. Clara fought for U.S. approval of the Geneva treaty for the care of war wounded, organized the American Red Cross, and tirelessly dedicated her life to its service. Her courage and compassion impacted thousands of people around the globe -- black and white, Christian and Muslim, Spanish and American, Confederate and Union.
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