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  1. The Passionate Intellect

    The Passionate Intellect

    Incarnational Humanism and the Future of University Education

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 6.5 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $13.98 Member Price: $11.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $13.98 Member Price: $11.18 (or 2 credits)
    In The Passionate Intellect, Norman Klassen and Jens Zimmermann trace the history of higher education from its medieval roots to the present, focusing on how educational agendas have been assembled in light of shifting understandings of the nature of knowledge and the nature of human well-being. They demonstrate that some form of humanism has always been central to the purposes of higher education, and insist that the recovery of a rich, Christocentric Christian humanism is the only way for the University to recover a coherent purpose.
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  2. Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 100-104

    Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 100-104

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Guests on Volume 100: Jennifer Burns, on the life and legacy of Ayn Rand, "goddess of the market" and entrenched enemy of altruism; Christian Smith, on the aimless cultural world of "emerging adulthood" and on how it makes the idea of objective moral order implausible; and Dallas Willard, on why it's important to recover the conviction that religious beliefs involve real knowledge. In honor of the five score milestone, part two of the issue features a look back at the beginnings of the Journal and a few special excerpts of conversations with those early guests, including Peter Kreeft on Lewis, Huxley, and J.F.K. after death; P. D. James, on good and evil in fiction; James Davison Hunter, on culture wars; Paul McHugh, on when psychiatry loses its way; Ted Prescott, on nudity in art and advertising; Ed Knippers, on the powerful presence of the body; Martha Bayles, on pop and perverse modernism; Dominic Aquila, on Christopher Lasch; Gilbert Meilaender, on random kindness; Neil Postman, on technology and culture; and Alan Jacobs, on being maudlin in Madison County. Guests on Volume 101: James Davison Hunter, on how the most prominent strategies of Christian cultural engagement are based on a misunderstanding about how cultures work; Paul Spears, on why Christian scholars need to understand their disciplines in ways that depart from conventional understanding; Steven Loomis, on why education needs to attend more carefully to nonquantifiable aspects of human experience; James K. A. Smith, on how education always involves the formation of affections and how the form of Christian education should imitate patterns of formation evident in historic Christian liturgy; Thomas Long, on how funeral practices have the capacity to convey an understanding of the meaning of discipleship and death; and William T. Cavanaugh, on the distinctly modern definition of "religion" and how the conventional account of the "Wars of Religion" misrepresents the facts in the interest of consolidating state power. Guests on Volume 102: Daniel M. Bell, Jr., on recovering the view that the just war tradition is more about the shaping of character and virtue than a checklist for political leaders; Lew Daly, on how the discussion concerning faith-based initiatives raised larger issues about the identity of social groups in American society; Adam K. Webb, on whether the traditional personal and communal virtues in premodern village life must be abandoned for poverty to be alleviated; Stratford Caldecott, on how denying the reality of beauty is linked to a denial of the coherent meaning of Creation; James Matthew Wilson, on Jacques Maritain's pilgrimage to faith and his subsequent development of a rich philosophy of beauty; and Thomas Hibbs, on the similar projects of painters Georges Rouault (1871-1958) and Makoto Fujimura (b. 1960), and how they each resisted various confusions in modern art. Guests on Volume 103: Steven D. Smith, on how the law only makes sense in the context of certain metaphysical beliefs, and on why we aren't allowed to talk about such things in public; David Thomson, on the American Dream, acting, loneliness, the moral complicity of movie audiences, and the genius of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho; Adam McHugh, on how American culture distrusts introverts and on why their place in the Church needs to be valued; Glenn C. Arbery, on the Vanderbilt Agrarians, poetry, and the moral imagination and the shaping of virtue; Eric Miller, on Christopher Lasch's intense commitment to understand the logic of American cultural confusion; and Eric Metaxas, on how Dietrich Bonhoeffer's early experiences prepared him for his heroic defiance of the Third Reich. Guests on Volume 104: James Le Fanu, on the mistaken assumption that modern medical science has eliminated the fittingness of a sense of mystery and wonder at the human mind and body; Garret Keizer, on how many noises in modern life reveal a state of warfare with the limitations of our embodiment; Daniel Ritchie, on how Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) and Isaac Watts (1674-1748) anticipated late twentieth-century critiques of the Enlightenment; Monica Ganas, on how the distinct vision of life embedded in "California-ism" has exerted a powerful cultural influence; Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, on how the search for faithfulness to Christ led him to the wisdom of the Benedictine Rule and a "new monasticism"; and Peter J. Leithart, on why Constantine has an unfairly bad reputation and on how his rule dealt a severe blow to paganism in the West.
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  3. The Good City

    The Good City

    Community and Urban Order

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.65 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $5.98 Member Price: $4.78 (or 1 credit)
    Regular Price: $5.98 Member Price: $4.78 (or 1 credit)
    In this Anthology, Ken Myers talks with architects, historians, activists, and clergy about how loving our neighbors can and must take shape in how we order the material aspects of shared life. The conversations on this Anthology give particular attention to how the New Urbanist movement has challenged the dehumanizing effects of modernism in urban design.
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  4. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 130

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 130

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 2.3 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    1. Introduction to Volume 130 2. Jacob Silverman on the hidden costs of social media 3. Carson Holloway on political science and revelation 4. Joseph Atkinson on a theology of the family 5. Greg Peters on lessons from monasticism 6. Antonio López on gift and the meaning of freedom 7. Julian Johnson on music and the spirit of modernity
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  5. The Vocation of Knowledge: Higher Education and the Difference Christ Makes

    The Vocation of Knowledge: Higher Education and the Difference Christ Makes

    Book 8

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.3 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $5.98 Member Price: $4.78 (or 1 credit)
    Regular Price: $5.98 Member Price: $4.78 (or 1 credit)
    Mark Noll (The Future of Christian Learning) describes why serious Christian learning requires a confidence that the Gospel has broad social and intellectual consequences. Norman Klassen and Jens Zimmermann (The Passionate Intellect: Incarnational Humanism and the Future of University Education) explain why the term "Christian humanism" is especially apt in describing the aims of Christian higher education. James K. A. Smith (Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation) develops the idea that education is more about formation than information, and that we are formed by our participation in liturgies, whether at church or at the mall.
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  6. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 105

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 105

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.85 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 105: Julian Young, on the historical context of Friedrich Nietzsche's ideas and on why he still believed in the necessity of religion; Perry L. Glanzer, on the failure of American universities to adequately address the challenge of moral formation; Kenda Creasy Dean, on why churches are to blame for the "moralistic therapeutic Deism" so common among teens; Brian Brock, on how the centrality of technology in Western culture encourages us to see the gift of Creation as merely "nature" awaiting our manipulation; Nicholas Carr, on how the distracted character of multi-tasking ruins reading and how social networking systems sustain a "transactional" view of relationships; and Alan Jacobs, on how the literary form of the essay reproduces the unpredictable way that our thoughts develop.
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  7. The Practice of Christian Pedagogy

    The Practice of Christian Pedagogy

    Conversation 28

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 0.93 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $5.98 Member Price: $4.78 (or 1 credit)
    Regular Price: $5.98 Member Price: $4.78 (or 1 credit)
    In recent years, Christian educators have rediscovered ancient ideas about how the head and heart interact. There is a relationship between the cultivation of affections, dispositions, and virtues, and the acquisition of knowledge. David I. Smith, director of the Kuyers Institute for Christian Teaching and Learning at Calvin College, describes how he came to realize that the shape and texture of pedagogy was as important as the content of knowledge presented in the classroom.
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  8. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 82

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 82

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.83 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 82: Stephen Gardner, on how modern culture weakens religion and establishes a new definition of the public; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, on Tom Wolfe and Philip Rieff's diagnosis of cultural disorder; Wilfred McClay, on how Philip Rieff's brilliant critique of modern disorder kept him from realizing a way out of our dilemma; David Wells, on how Western culture has eclipsed fundamental assumptions about human nature and God; James K. A. Smith, on the postmodern insight that our experience in the world requires interpretation (and that some interpretations are better than others); and Robert Littlejohn, on how education should encourage wisdom and eloquence in students.
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  9. Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 105-109

    Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 105-109

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Guests on Volume 105: Julian Young, on the historical context of Friedrich Nietzsche's ideas and on why he still believed in the necessity of religion; Perry L. Glanzer, on the failure of American universities to adequately address the challenge of moral formation; Kenda Creasy Dean, on why churches are to blame for the "moralistic therapeutic Deism" so common among teens; Brian Brock, on how the centrality of technology in Western culture encourages us to see the gift of Creation as merely "nature" awaiting our manipulation; Nicholas Carr, on how the distracted character of multi-tasking ruins reading and how social networking systems sustain a "transactional" view of relationships; and Alan Jacobs, on how the literary form of the essay reproduces the unpredictable way that our thoughts develop. Guests on Volume 106: Adam Briggle, on how Leon Kass's leadership of the President's Council on Bioethics attempted to reframe public thinking about ethical matters; John C. Médaille, on why economics should be concerned with ethical matters from the bottom up; Christopher Page, on how the presence of choral music in the Church shaped the rise of the West; Christian Smith, on why sociologists need a richer understanding of human nature and human personhood and should recognize "love" as an essential human attribute; Herman Daly, on why he and Wendell Berry are disturbed by the lack of attention paid by classical economics to the realities of the material world; and Thomas Hibbs, on the dark nihilism in the films of Woody Allen. Guests on Volume 107: Victor Lee Austin, on why authority is not a barrier to true freedom and is necessary for human flourishing (and will be forever); Ellen T. Charry, on why happiness has been underplayed in Christian theology (and why it shouldn't be); Anthony Esolen, on the explicit and implicit teaching that has caused many young people to be cynical and unhappy; Ferdinand Schlingensiepen, on the ambivalence of postwar Germans to the anti-Nazi resistance movement (and to Dietrich Bonhoeffer); Allen Verhey, on why it's dangerous to draw too stark a line between nature and supernature; and Calvin Stapert, on the historical, theological, and musical elements that combined to produce Handel's Messiah. Guests on Volume 108: Thomas Albert Howard, on why many nineteenth-century Europeans were nervous about the shape of American religious life; Jean Porter, on how natural law provides a rationale for the rule of law and for legislative and judicial authority; Peter Augustine Lawler, on how neither ancient philosophy nor modern science explain human nature (but the Logos does); Hans Boersma, on why Christians should reject the modern separation of Heaven and Earth and recover a "sacramental ontology"; Felicia Wu Song, on how online communication systems shape relationships and community; and Elias Aboujaoude, on how life online makes us think we’re bigger, badder, and smarter than we really are. Guests on Volume 109: Douglas Coupland, on the strange and wonderful life and thought of media guru Marshall McLuhan; Charles Mathewes, on lessons from Augustine on thinking about our political lives in theological terms; William T. Cavanaugh, on how the modern state is a unique kind of political entity, inviting a new kind of idolatry; William Dyrness, on the challenges of developing a positive theology of desire and the imagination; Steven Guthrie, on relating the Spirit's work in making us human to what happens in art and human creativity; and Susannah Clements, on the changing view of evil evident in the evolution of vampires from Bram Stoker to Sookie Stackhouse.
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