Grid List

Set Ascending Direction

1-15 of 71

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  1. Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 90-94

    Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 90-94

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Guests on Volume 90: J. Mark Bertrand, on how the language of "worldviews" can mean something richer than it often does; Michael P. Schutt, on how the day-to-day practice of Christian lawyers can reflect a Christian view of the nature of law; Michael Ward, on how C. S. Lewis'sChronicles of Narnia were shaped by medieval cosmological beliefs about the seven planets; Dana Gioia, on the disturbing trends in the reading (non)habits of Americans; Makoto Fujimura, on reading, painting, and attending to the world; Gregory Edward Reynolds, on lessons about reading from the study of media ecology; Catherine Prescott, on why portrait painters often depict their subjects with books in their hands; and Eugene Peterson, on the place of reading in the spiritual lives of Christians. Guests on Volume 91: John Witte, Jr., on the life and work of legal historian Harold Berman and on the revolutionary changes throughout the history of law in the West; Hugh Brogan, on Alexis de Tocqueville’s understanding of democracy, equality, liberty, free association, social status, and the dangers of centralized government; Daniel Ritchie, on Tocqueville’s analysis of the dangers of individualism (and how they might be avoided); Daniel Walker Howe, on the confidence in progress and Providence in early 19th-century America; George McKenna, on how the Puritan understanding of God’s purposes in history shaped American political culture; and Patrick Deneen, on the differences between Aristotelian and modern political philosophy and on how Wendell Berry’s thought demonstrates his identity as a "Kentucky Aristotelian." Guests on Volume 92: Jake Halpern, on the ecosystem of celebrity and the complicated reasons why people seek to become famous; Stephen J. Nichols, on how the dynamics of American culture have shaped our understanding of who Jesus is; Richard M. Gamble, on resources for and the outlines of a theology of education; Peter J. Leithart, on how concerns from some postmodern thinkers echo the eschatological perspective of Solomon (as presented in the book of Ecclesiastes); Bill Vitek, on how wise living on the Earth requires the humble recognition of our ignorance as well as the application of knowledge; and Craig Holdrege, on lessons from Goethe about how we understand the rest of Creation as participants, not detached and potentially omniscient observers, and also on the "conversational" quality of our engagement with Creation. Guests on Volume 93: Alan Jacobs, on practical consequences of belief in original sin (and the five distinct components of that belief); James A. Herrick, on redemptive myths advanced by science fiction and speculative science and on evolution as a religion; J. Daryl Charles, on the commitment by the magisterial Reformers to the idea of natural law; Robert C. Roberts, on the role of emotions in ethical and spiritual life; Allan C. Carlson, on how the industrial revolution changed the shape of households (including their floorplans) and the understanding of marriage; and Sheila O'Connor-Ambrose, on the work of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese in defending marriage against the various claims of individualism. Guests on Volume 94: Maggie Jackson, on how multitasking exalts efficiency and promises the overcoming of bodily limitations as time is restructured and on the importance of attentiveness in sustaining personal and social order; Mark Bauerlein, on how technologies have rearranged the social lives of teens (and their expectations of education); Tim Clydesdale, on what the first year in college means for teens; Andy Crouch, on the physical basis of cultural life and how "culture making" is done; and Jeremy Begbie, on how music is a way of engaging with the order in Creation and on how writing and hearing music involves a recognition of likenesses in Creation and the exercise of "hyper-hearing."
    Learn More
  2. Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 80-84

    Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 80-84

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Guests on Volume 80: Stephen A. McKnight, on The Religious Foundations of Francis Bacon's Thought; Tim Morris & Don Petcher, on science, Christology, and why segregating nature from supernature doesn't do justice to either; Vigen Guroian, on the mystical character of fragrance and on why working in his garden is an imitation of the Master Gardener; Paul Valliere, on Orthodox theology's engagement with questions concerning law, politics, and human nature, and on the ideas of Vladimir Soloviev (1853-1900); Vigen Guroian, on the importance of personality and community in the thought of Nicholas Berdyaev (1874-1948); and Calvin Stapert, on the affirmation of Creation and intimations of transcendence in the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Guests on Volume 81: Nigel Cameron, on the lack of ethical reflection in public policy on technology; Joel James Shuman, on beliefs about God's nature and purposes informing how we think about sickness and medicine; Brian Volck, on embodied life, stories, and how medical practice involves attending to the stories of the bodies of patients; Russell Hittinger, on the modern state giving rise to modern Catholic social thought; Mark Noll, on learning to think about law and politics from earlier Christians who lived in very different political circumstances; and Stephen Miller, on the factors that sustain the art of conversation, and why it's a dying art. Guests on Volume 82: Stephen Gardner, on how modern culture weakens religion and establishes a new definition of the public; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, on Tom Wolfe and Philip Rieff's diagnosis of cultural disorder; Wilfred McClay, on how Philip Rieff's brilliant critique of modern disorder kept him from realizing a way out of our dilemma; David Wells, on how Western culture has eclipsed fundamental assumptions about human nature and God; James K. A. Smith, on the postmodern insight that our experience in the world requires interpretation (and that some interpretations are better than others); and Robert Littlejohn, on how education should encourage wisdom and eloquence in students. Guests on Volume 83: Barrett Fisher, on film noir and its revealing portrayal of human moral confusion; Dick Keyes, on contemporary cynicism, how it's destructive, and how it might be resisted; Richard Lints, on a distinctively theological approach to understanding human identity; Paul McHugh, on how the discipline of psychiatry needs to mature, and on "stories" as diagnostic tools; Paul Weston, on lessons from Lesslie Newbigin on interfaith dialogue and the attacks on Christianity from scientism; and Paul Walker, on how the forms of Renaissance choral music communicate rich theological concerns. Guests on Volume 84: Harry R. Lewis, on higher education's amnesia about its purposes, and how that shortchanges students; Nicholas Wolterstorff, on Abraham Kuyper (1837-1927), the French Revolution, worldviews, and "sphere sovereignty"; Brendan Sweetman, on why religious worldviews should not be excluded from political life; James Turner Johnson, on the development of Christian thought about the meaning of marriage; David Martin, on how the 1960s replayed themes of the 1890s and 1930s; and Edward Ericson, Jr., on Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's beginnings and legacy.
    Learn More
  3. Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 70-74

    Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 70-74

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Regular Price: $23.99 Member Price: $19.19 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $23.99 Member Price: $19.19 (or 4 credits)
    Guests on Volume 70: W. Wesley McDonald, on the significance of Russell Kirk's themes of the "permanent things" and "the moral imagination"; C. Ben Mitchell, on law, wisdom, and the possibilities of pastoral guidance on bioethical decisions, and on why and how the Church should be more welcoming toward the elderly; Carl Elliott, on the medical industry's move from healing to enhancing self-esteem and idenity formation; Richard Weikart, on the rise of "evolutionary ethics," the embrace toward ethical relativism, and the slide toward eugenics; Christine Rosen, on how and why early 20th century American religious leaders encouraged eugenics in the name of moral progress; and Dana Gioia, on the decline in literary reading in America and on the cultural loss it signifies. Guests on Volume 71: Peter Augustine Lawler, on Luther, Locke, liberty, and the American Founding Fathers; David Koyzis, on the modern denial of objective meaning and the exaltation of individual will; Roger Lundin, on the incarnational vision of Czeslaw Milosz, and on his poetry of exile and modern boundlessness; Craig Gay, on how the nature of money affects our sense of attributing value to things; Steven Rhoads, on Taking Sex Differences Seriously(and why it's hard to do so); and R. Larry Todd, on the life and music of Felix Mendelssohn. Guests on Volume 72: John Polkinghorne, on lessons for theology learned from the inductive nature of the work of science; Francesca Aran Murphy, on the efforts of 20th-century Catholic and French philosopher Étienne Gilson to reconcile faith and reason; James Hitchcock, on the history of the Supreme Court's decisions regarding religious practice and liberty; Wilfred McClay, on Nathaniel Hawthorne's vision of the intractability of human failings and the possibilities of the American experiment, and on the theme of place and communal obligation in Nathaniel Hawthorne's writing; Philip McFarland, on how Hawthorne's sensitivity to the darker side of human nature makes him perennially instructive; and David Hackett Fischer, on the history of how Americans have understood and symbolized freedom and liberty. Guests on Volume 73: Richard John Neuhaus et al., on the meaning and value of human life, the vocation of medicine, the logic of autonomous individualism, and the temptation of suicide and euthanasia; Patrick Carey, on the perceptive (and peregrinating) thought of Orestes Brownson; John W. O'Malley, on the prophetic, academic, humanistic, and artistic vectors of Western culture; Patricia Owen, on what makes good children's books and on how the Newbery Medal winners have changed over time; Susan Srigley, on the sacramental and incarnational fiction of Flannery O'Connor; and Ralph C. Wood, on Flannery O'Connor as "hill-billy Thomist" and sympathizer with backwoods religion. Guests on Volume 74: Russell Moore, on the struggles at Baylor University, "soul competency," and the Baptist culture of autonomy; W. Bradford Wilcox, on the characteristics of "soft patriarchy" in evangelical families; Joseph E. Davis, on sexual abuse, how it is explained, and how a sense of identity is thereby formed; Barrett Fisher, on the remarkable achievement of film producer Ismail Merchant; Jeanne Murray Walker & Darryl Tippens, on overcoming the neglect of literature that highlights the spiritual dimension of human experience; and Paul Walker, on the life and music of English organist and composer Thomas Tallis, 1505-1585.
    Learn More
  4. Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 85-89

    Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 85-89

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $23.98 Member Price: $19.18 (or 4 credits)
    Guests on Volume 85: C. John Sommerville, on how higher education, divorced from higher realities, has become socially irrelevant; Catherine Albanese, on American "metaphysical religion," varieties of gnosticism, and the quest for spiritual energy; Christopher Shannon, on how social scientists encouraged the rise of autonomous individualism in 20th-century America; Michael G. Lawler, on the development of the idea of marriage as covenant in Roman Catholic thought; Gilbert Meilaender, on lessons from Augustine in defining proper expectations for the Christian life; Matthew Dickerson, on J. R. R. Tolkien's vision of stewardship of the earth: the glory of trees and the shepherdhood of ents. Guests on Volume 86: Roger Lundin on why, after Vietnam, American literary critics forgot about American religion; Lawrence Buell, on diverse visions of America and Nature; Harold K. Bush, Jr., on the glorification of the American way as a civil religion; Roger Lundin, on the transformation of the nature of belief in the late 19th century; Katherine Shaw Spaht, on radical autonomy, marriage, divorce, and law; Steven L. Nock, on how broadly shared cultural assumptions affect laws regulating marriage and divorce; Norman Klassen & Jens Zimmermann, on the Incarnation and humanism, and on how various dualisms affect our assumptions about faith, knowledge, and higher education. Guests on Volume 87: John Witte, Jr., on law and religion in the Western tradition; Steven Keillor, on God’s judgments and history; Philip Bess, on New Urbanism and natural law; Scott Cairns, on words and poetry’s work; and Anthony Esolen, on literary critics and Christian belief. Guests on Volume 88: Michael J. Lewis, on Body Worlds, human nature and Western Art; Diana Pavlac Glyer, on the influence of the Inklings on each others’ writings; Steve Talbott, on how the aims of education are distracted by technology; Darryl Tippens, on why we sing; Everett Ferguson, on the place of music in the Early Church; Alexander Lingas, on the tradition of music in the Eastern churches; and Calvin Stapert, on the nature of meaning in music. Guests on Volume 89: Thomas Hibbs, on the theme of the possibility of redemption in film noir and similar film genres; Barrett Fisher, on the films of screenwriter Charlie Kaufman; Fred Turner, on 1960s dreams of countercultural change and the rise of the Whole Earth Catalog; Dan Blazer, on why psychiatric disorders require attention to the story of patients’ lives; Christopher Lane, on the complex characteristics of anxiety and the tendency to treat the absence of ease with drugs; and Jerome C. Wakefield, on how psychiatry began ignoring causes of mental suffering and so defined sadness as a disease.
    Learn More
  5. Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 75-79

    Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 75-79

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Regular Price: $23.99 Member Price: $19.19 (or 4 credits)
    Regular Price: $23.99 Member Price: $19.19 (or 4 credits)
    Guests on Volume 75: Mark Malvasi, on John Lukacs, the meaning of the modern, and how to think about history; John Lukacs, on the roles of curiosity and language in the vocation of historians; Steve Talbott, on how communications technologies divert language from its richest possibilities; Christian Smith, on the spiritual lives and theological assumptions of American teenagers; Eugene Peterson, on the essential relationship between theology and spirituality, and on the narrative life of congregations; and Rolland Hein, on the life and imagination of George MacDonald. Guests on Volume 76: D. H. Williams, on the Church's rootedness in its Tradition, why some Protestants remain suspicious, and on the excluding character of Christian conversion; Catherine Edwards Sanders, on the spiritual hunger behind the rise of modern witchcraft; Ted Prescott, on changing images of beauty and the human figure in 20th century art; Martin X. Moleski, on the life, times, and remarkable insights of Michael Polanyi; Stephen Prickett, on George MacDonald and the tasks of imagination; and Barrett Fisher, on the relative artistic assets of film and literature. Guests on Volume 77: Eric Miller, on the conserving radicalism and revolutionary traditionalism of Christopher Lasch; Lisa de Boer, on the depiction of everyday humanity in northern European post-Renaissance painting; Peter J. Schakel, on seeing The Chronicles of Narnia as fairy tales, not just Christian allegory; and Alan Jacobs, on how The Chronicles of Narnia reveal much of C. S. Lewis's thinking on almost everything, and on how Lewis's imagination was prepared to write such books. Guests on Volume 78: Mark Bauerlein, on the causes of disengagement of college students from concern for intellectual and civic life; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, on television, children, and acquiring a sense of reality; Sam Van Eman, on the view of the good life advanced by advertising; Thomas de Zengotita, on Mediated: How the Media Shapes Your World and the Way You Live in It, and on postmodern individualism and "reality" TV; Eugene McCarraher, on how American management theory became an influential source of religious meaning and practice; and John Witte, Jr., on how law embodies a view of human nature, and why religious viewpoints have often been ignored. Guests on Volume 79: Carson Holloway, on why sociobiology and evolutionary psychology are inadequate bases for sustaining political ideals; Peter Augustine Lawler, on why we are more than "individuals" narrowly defined; Hadley Arkes, on the difference, in law, between evidence from social scientific data and moral truths; Ben Witherington, III, on why The Da Vinci Code's implausible account of history seems credible to many people; Christopher Shannon, on Ivan Illich (Medical Nemesis) and the loss of belief in the possibility that suffering can be meaningful; Roger Lundin, on how nature and experience replaced revelation as a source of authority (and why they fail to serve as such), and on the necessity of humility in writing biographies.
    Learn More
  6. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 125

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 125

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 2 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 125: Brent Hull, on the virtues of craftsmanship; David Koyzis, on the goodness and nature of authority; Steve Wilkens, on three Christian views of the relationship between faith and reason; Roger Lundin, on faith and doubt in an inescapably verbal universe; Craig Bernthal, on the Christian doctrine of Creation in Tolkien’s mythic writings; and Kerry McCarthy, on the life and legacy of English Renaissance composer William Byrd.
    Learn More
  7. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 101

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 101

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.9 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 101: James Davison Hunter, on how the most prominent strategies of Christian cultural engagement are based on a misunderstanding about how cultures work; Paul Spears, on why Christian scholars need to understand their disciplines in ways that depart from conventional understanding; Steven Loomis, on why education needs to attend more carefully to nonquantifiable aspects of human experience; James K. A. Smith, on how education always involves the formation of affections and how the form of Christian education should imitate patterns of formation evident in historic Christian liturgy; Thomas Long, on how funeral practices have the capacity to convey an understanding of the meaning of discipleship and death; and William T. Cavanaugh, on the distinctly modern definition of "religion" and how the conventional account of the "Wars of Religion" misrepresents the facts in the interest of consolidating state power.
    Learn More
  8. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 67

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 67

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.65 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 67: Eric O. Jacobsen, on urban churches and taking the concrete realities of community seriously; Allan C. Carlson, on the family in American culture and in government policy; Terence L. Nichols, on a sacramental view of Creation as an alternative to naturalism; R. R. Reno, on spiritual lethargy and sloth and the need for a more heroic vision for spiritual possibility; David Bentley Hart, on a Christian understanding of beauty rooted in the reality of the divine gift that is Creation; and J. A. C. Redford & Scott Cairns, on the making of “The Martyrdom of Polycarp.”
    Learn More
  9. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 87

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 87

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.78 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 87: John Witte, Jr., on law and religion in the Western tradition; Steven Keillor, on God’s judgments and history; Philip Bess, on New Urbanism and natural law; Scott Cairns, on words and poetry’s work; and Anthony Esolen, on literary critics and Christian belief.
    Learn More
  10. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 79

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 79

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.77 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 79: Carson Holloway, on why sociobiology and evolutionary psychology are inadequate bases for sustaining political ideals; Peter Augustine Lawler, on why we are more than "individuals" narrowly defined; Hadley Arkes, on the difference, in law, between evidence from social scientific data and moral truths; Ben Witherington, III, on why The Da Vinci Code's implausible account of history seems credible to many people; Christopher Shannon, on Ivan Illich (Medical Nemesis) and the loss of belief in the possibility that suffering can be meaningful; Roger Lundin, on how nature and experience replaced revelation as a source of authority (and why they fail to serve as such), and on the necessity of humility in writing biographies.
    Learn More
  11. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 108

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 108

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.9 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 108: Thomas Albert Howard, on why many nineteenth-century Europeans were nervous about the shape of American religious life; Jean Porter, on how natural law provides a rationale for the rule of law and for legislative and judicial authority; Peter Augustine Lawler, on how neither ancient philosophy nor modern science explain human nature (but the Logos does); Hans Boersma, on why Christians should reject the modern separation of Heaven and Earth and recover a "sacramental ontology"; Felicia Wu Song, on how online communication systems shape relationships and community; and Elias Aboujaoude, on how life online makes us think we’re bigger, badder, and smarter than we really are.
    Learn More
  12. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 74

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 74

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 1.75 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 74: Russell Moore, on the struggles at Baylor University, "soul competency," and the Baptist culture of autonomy; W. Bradford Wilcox, on the characteristics of "soft patriarchy" in evangelical families; Joseph E. Davis, on sexual abuse, how it is explained, and how a sense of identity is thereby formed; Barrett Fisher, on the remarkable achievement of film producer Ismail Merchant; Jeanne Murray Walker & Darryl Tippens, on overcoming the neglect of literature that highlights the spiritual dimension of human experience; and Paul Walker, on the life and music of English organist and composer Thomas Tallis, 1505-1585.
    Learn More
  13. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 95

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 95

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 2 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 95: Stewart Davenport, on how nineteenth-century Christians separated the moral and practical aspects of economic life; William T. Cavanaugh, on how theology and economics are necessarily intertwined and on how a larger understanding of the meaning of "freedom" would change our economic actions; J. Matthew Bonzo & Michael R. Stevens, on Wendell Berry's concern for the dislocating and fragmenting forces in modern life; Craig Gay, on how language—specifically the spoken word—is central to our human experience; Eugene Peterson, on how Jesus' use of ambiguous language encouraged active spiritual engagement; and Barry Hankins, on how the late Francis Schaeffer moved from being a defensive fundamentalist to a prophet of cultural engagement.
    Learn More
  14. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 123

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 123

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 2.17 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 123: Nicholas M. Healy, on some of the practical and theological weaknesses in the writings of Stanley Hauerwas; Christian Smith, on the spiritual lives of emerging adults raised within the Roman Catholic Church and taught at Catholic schools; James K. A. Smith, on Charles Taylor's explanation (in The Secular Age) of how modern culture came to unlearn the theistic assumption of the West; Esther Lightcap Meek, on why pitting "objectivity" against "subjectivity" in describing the nature of knowledge isn't helpful, and on why all knowing involves making a commitment; Richard Viladesau, on the relationship between formal, propositional, academic theology and the theological expressions found in works of art and music; and Jeremy Begbie, on why theologians should be more interested in how music and modernity have interacted.
    Learn More
  15. Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 115

    Mars Hill Audio Journal, Volume 115

    Narrator: Ken Myers
    Runtime: 2.2 Hrs. - Unabridged
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Regular Price: $8.98 Member Price: $7.18 (or 2 credits)
    Guests on Volume 115: Arlie Russell Hochschild, on how the reliance in personal life on professional consultants establishes market-shaped models for imagining personal identity; Andrew Davison, on why a fully Christian approach to apologetics requires a Christian understanding of reason; Adrian Pabst, on why only a Christian understanding of God and Creation can provide the ground for understanding the order of reality; Gary Colledge, on the centrality of Christian belief to the writings and social concerns of Charles Dickens; Linda Lewis, on how Charles Dickens assumed in his readers a basic Biblical literacy, and so constructed his stories in a sort of conversation with the teaching of Jesus; and Thomas Bergler, on how the Church's captivity to youth culture eclipses concern for (or even a belief in the possibility of) Christian maturity.
    Learn More

Grid List

Set Ascending Direction

1-15 of 71

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5