Audiobook Download

Classics of the Christian Faith

Author Various
Narrator Max McLean
Runtime 7.7 Hrs. - Unabridged
Publisher Fellowship for the Performing Arts
Downloads ZIP M4B MP3
Release Date February 22, 2008
Availability: Unrestricted (available worldwide)

Here in one collection, these five classics – each in an easy-to-listen-to narration with an introduction to set up its moment in history – are vividly brought to life by master storyteller, Max McLean. Next to the Bible, these classics have had the most impact on the Christian faith.

Regular Price: $47.98 Member Price: $38.38 (or 9 credits)
Description

Five Classics that Still Ignite Hearts and Minds.

Here in one collection, these five classics – each in an easy-to-listen-to narration with an introduction to set up its moment in history – are vividly brought to life by master storyteller, Max McLean. Next to the Bible, these classics have had the most impact on the Christian faith.

What Christian Leaders are saying:

"I love these presentations of the classics by Max McLean...Luther's 'Here I Stand' is my favorite." -R. C. Sproul

"Max McLean's 'Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God' has struck a match in my heart to share the Gospel with urgency and clarity! Max has breathed new life into the timeless words of Jonathan Edwards!" -Joni Eareckson Tada

"In McLean's 'The Method of Grace' we see how the great preachers of the Great Awakening brought the Gospel into connection with people's hearts not just their heads." -Tim Keller

"Augustine meant for his spiritual autobiography to be read aloud. Max McLean's moving rendition of St. Augustine's Conversion sends chills down the listener's spine." -Quentin J. Schultze, Ph.D.

Customer Reviews

2 Reviews Add Review
Outstanding audio book
Well worth the money and the time. A must for every Christian audiobook enthusiast!
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 11/26/2011)
McLean’s rendition of both Luther and...
McLean’s rendition of both Luther and Augustine’s was excellent in their own right. The additional contextual information provided by Max at the beginning of both narrations helped immensely in understanding the context of what was taking place. The narration of Edwards and Whitefield’s, however, deserves much attention.

George Whitefield was known for his ability to command an audience whenever he spoke. He was arguably the greatest orator of his time. Max McLean played that to the hilt as only Max can do. The dramatic pauses and variation of speech tempo was very much appreciated. His voice would raise to a crescendo and then fall to a whisper at just the right moment. I was listening to this sermon while driving my car and, on a couple occasions, wanted to pull over and repent of sins as though it were the first time I had ever heard the gospel preached. This sermon alone is worth the price of the set. It makes an excellent resource to share with an unbeliever willing to listen.

He reads Edwards with the gravity that was surely felt on that fateful day in Enfield, Connecticut July 8, 1741. I found myself personally cringing and tensing up at the thought of what it would be like to fall into God’s hands as an unrepentant sinner. The “forward” by R.C. Sproul was very helpful in shedding light on some mischaracterizations of Jonathan Edwards and in particular this sermon. As it was with the Whitefield narration, this particular sermon is also worth the price of the set.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 11/14/2009)