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Finding God in the Hunger Games

Author Ken Gire
Narrator David Cochran Heath
Runtime 1.85 Hrs. - Unabridged
Publisher christianaudio
Downloads ZIP M4B MP3
Release Date October 5, 2012
Availability: Unrestricted (available worldwide)

On the back cover of Suzanne Collin's book are these words: "In the ruins of a place once known as North America . . . ." 

One doesn't have to be a prophet to see the frightening vision of what the future holds, not only for North America but for the world.  This book is explores the absence of God and the consequences of his absence in our individual lives and in the collective life of the state. And yet, the image of God still resides in us, offering hope.

First, Ken Gire looks back at the first hunger games with the rise of the godless emperor, Nero, and the games he hosted in Rome, where he offered free food and entertainment to the populace. At first the games were gladiatorial contests, then the slaughter of Christians became the entertainment of the day.  Part Two examines the present hunger games and how they speak to the gnawing hunger within us, both individually and collectively. It shows how that hunger has expressed itself in our culture with the rise of a vicious competitive spirit that pervades politics, entertainment, and business.  Part Three of the book looks ahead to future hunger games. This glimpse into the future is based on Jesus' Olivet Discourse and his view of how society will deteriorate to a form of barbarism and totalitarianism in the end times.

The book ends with a call to be alert to what is taking place in the world and to stand resolute against the forces that appeal to our baser instincts, looking forward to the glorious return of Jesus Christ.

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Description

On the back cover of Suzanne Collin's book are these words: "In the ruins of a place once known as North America . . . ." 

One doesn't have to be a prophet to see the frightening vision of what the future holds, not only for North America but for the world.  This book is explores the absence of God and the consequences of his absence in our individual lives and in the collective life of the state. And yet, the image of God still resides in us, offering hope.

First, Ken Gire looks back at the first hunger games with the rise of the godless emperor, Nero, and the games he hosted in Rome, where he offered free food and entertainment to the populace. At first the games were gladiatorial contests, then the slaughter of Christians became the entertainment of the day.  Part Two examines the present hunger games and how they speak to the gnawing hunger within us, both individually and collectively. It shows how that hunger has expressed itself in our culture with the rise of a vicious competitive spirit that pervades politics, entertainment, and business.  Part Three of the book looks ahead to future hunger games. This glimpse into the future is based on Jesus' Olivet Discourse and his view of how society will deteriorate to a form of barbarism and totalitarianism in the end times.

The book ends with a call to be alert to what is taking place in the world and to stand resolute against the forces that appeal to our baser instincts, looking forward to the glorious return of Jesus Christ.

Customer Reviews

8 Reviews Add Review
Helpful Christian and pop culture perspective
This book can, I believe, inspire anyone from youth to Vhristians working with youth, to those like myself who were fans of the books and movies in high school or college. The author's writing style is both humble and pastoral.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 5/14/2017)
This is NOT about the Hunger Games
You know the Philosophy of… books? Like the Philosophy of the Simpsons where the authors break down the actions taken by the characters in that show to decompress the philosophies behind the actions? I love those kinds of books. I love when someone looks behind the show, book, movie to draw conclusions about what the characters believed or espoused or why they acted in such and such ways. This is not a book like that.

This is an ultra short book, with tons of unnecessary information that I came to believe was included to get the page count to publication length, that doesn’t AT ALL go into anything to do with the Hunger Games and God. In fact, the author early on states that there is NO connection between the Hunger Games and God. (He tries to make the parallel between the book of Esther that also doesn’t mention God, but God is in every part of the story, like Shakespeare is not in his works as a character, but is in his works in every word and page. But that doesn’t work at all here. God is not here and the author never intended to put Him in and none of the characters act like there is even such a thing as a god.)

So if God is not in the Hunger Games and the book isn’t about that what is the book about? Let me give you an example of what you can connect in short form: Panem, where the story in the Hunger Games takes place, means “bread” in Latin, which is the language of the Romans, which persecuted Christians and had the circus, which is where Christians died, which reminds us that we will all die, which brings up the End Times, which makes me scratch my head about what the heck is going on! This isn’t a stretch or a fabrication. Each of those topics are covered in depth but nothing at all about God in the Hunger Games.

As a Christian and a teacher I would have expected a tact bout how a soulless world where God was conspicuously absent would be like this hopeless, vile place where decadence and selfishness are pervasive and then move towards how the Hunger Games is a great starting point in apologetic conversations about what it would really mean to have a world without God. But the author doesn’t even go here; the most obvious connection.

(There, I just wrote a better book than the author did about God in the Hunger Games.)

This book, or pamphlet, is a mess of ideas that aren’t terrible but aren’t about the Hunger Games. This isn’t exegesis (finding God in the Hunger Games,) or even eisegesis (writing God into the Hunger Games). This is Proof Texting and then Tangent (finding a word in the Hunger Games that reminds you about what you wanted to talk about.)

Shame on Christian publishers for capitalizing on the success of the Hunger Games and rushing a sub-par book to print.

This book was provided by the publisher as a review copy.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 12/1/2012)
Interesting but Meaningless
Finding God in the Hunger Games by Ken Gire is an attempt to gain something other than entertainment out of the blockbuster book and film, The Hunger Games. It is evident early on in this short book that there are very few Christian aspects to be gleaned from the film but the author does raise some interesting social commentaries based on the content of the film.

I have seen many of this type of book before and I always wondered what obscure insights they had on films that are clearly not Christian influenced at all. I understand writing books on series like Narnia and to some extend The Lord of the Rings but books on other films just seem like a waste of time to me.

I really enjoyed the film when I saw it several months ago but at no stage did I think there were any Christian morals to come out of it, which is why I was surprised when I saw this book. The author does summarise parts of the film quite well and his social commentary of the world today was thought-provoking but it is not a book I will probably read again as it is a bit lacking in substance.

The narration was good and the story segments followed very nicely. It was easy to listen to and I could follow it without any problems.

Although this book does have some fascinating comments in it about the world today, it is not a book I would recommend to my friends unless they were really involved in The Hunger Games.

This audio book was gifted as a part of the christianaudio Reviewers Program in exchange for my unbiased review of this work. More information can be found about this and other Christian audio books at christianaudio.com.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 11/11/2012)
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