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Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 75-79

Series Mars Hill Audio Journal
Author Mars Hill Audio
Narrator Ken Myers
Publisher Mars Hill Audio
Downloads ZIP M4B
Release Date June 5, 2014
Availability: Unrestricted (available worldwide)
Guests on Volume 75: Mark Malvasi, on John Lukacs, the meaning of the modern, and how to think about history; John Lukacs, on the roles of curiosity and language in the vocation of historians; Steve Talbott, on how communications technologies divert language from its richest possibilities; Christian Smith, on the spiritual lives and theological assumptions of American teenagers; Eugene Peterson, on the essential relationship between theology and spirituality, and on the narrative life of congregations; and Rolland Hein, on the life and imagination of George MacDonald.

Guests on Volume 76: D. H. Williams, on the Church's rootedness in its Tradition, why some Protestants remain suspicious, and on the excluding character of Christian conversion; Catherine Edwards Sanders, on the spiritual hunger behind the rise of modern witchcraft; Ted Prescott, on changing images of beauty and the human figure in 20th century art; Martin X. Moleski, on the life, times, and remarkable insights of Michael Polanyi; Stephen Prickett, on George MacDonald and the tasks of imagination; and Barrett Fisher, on the relative artistic assets of film and literature.

Guests on Volume 77: Eric Miller, on the conserving radicalism and revolutionary traditionalism of Christopher Lasch; Lisa de Boer, on the depiction of everyday humanity in northern European post-Renaissance painting; Peter J. Schakel, on seeing The Chronicles of Narnia as fairy tales, not just Christian allegory; and Alan Jacobs, on how The Chronicles of Narnia reveal much of C. S. Lewis's thinking on almost everything, and on how Lewis's imagination was prepared to write such books.

Guests on Volume 78: Mark Bauerlein, on the causes of disengagement of college students from concern for intellectual and civic life; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, on television, children, and acquiring a sense of reality; Sam Van Eman, on the view of the good life advanced by advertising; Thomas de Zengotita, on Mediated: How the Media Shapes Your World and the Way You Live in It, and on postmodern individualism and "reality" TV; Eugene McCarraher, on how American management theory became an influential source of religious meaning and practice; and John Witte, Jr., on how law embodies a view of human nature, and why religious viewpoints have often been ignored.

Guests on Volume 79: Carson Holloway, on why sociobiology and evolutionary psychology are inadequate bases for sustaining political ideals; Peter Augustine Lawler, on why we are more than "individuals" narrowly defined; Hadley Arkes, on the difference, in law, between evidence from social scientific data and moral truths; Ben Witherington, III, on why The Da Vinci Code's implausible account of history seems credible to many people; Christopher Shannon, on Ivan Illich (Medical Nemesis) and the loss of belief in the possibility that suffering can be meaningful; Roger Lundin, on how nature and experience replaced revelation as a source of authority (and why they fail to serve as such), and on the necessity of humility in writing biographies.
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Guests on Volume 75: Mark Malvasi, on John Lukacs, the meaning of the modern, and how to think about history; John Lukacs, on the roles of curiosity and language in the vocation of historians; Steve Talbott, on how communications technologies divert language from its richest possibilities; Christian Smith, on the spiritual lives and theological assumptions of American teenagers; Eugene Peterson, on the essential relationship between theology and spirituality, and on the narrative life of congregations; and Rolland Hein, on the life and imagination of George MacDonald.

Guests on Volume 76: D. H. Williams, on the Church's rootedness in its Tradition, why some Protestants remain suspicious, and on the excluding character of Christian conversion; Catherine Edwards Sanders, on the spiritual hunger behind the rise of modern witchcraft; Ted Prescott, on changing images of beauty and the human figure in 20th century art; Martin X. Moleski, on the life, times, and remarkable insights of Michael Polanyi; Stephen Prickett, on George MacDonald and the tasks of imagination; and Barrett Fisher, on the relative artistic assets of film and literature.

Guests on Volume 77: Eric Miller, on the conserving radicalism and revolutionary traditionalism of Christopher Lasch; Lisa de Boer, on the depiction of everyday humanity in northern European post-Renaissance painting; Peter J. Schakel, on seeing The Chronicles of Narnia as fairy tales, not just Christian allegory; and Alan Jacobs, on how The Chronicles of Narnia reveal much of C. S. Lewis's thinking on almost everything, and on how Lewis's imagination was prepared to write such books.

Guests on Volume 78: Mark Bauerlein, on the causes of disengagement of college students from concern for intellectual and civic life; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, on television, children, and acquiring a sense of reality; Sam Van Eman, on the view of the good life advanced by advertising; Thomas de Zengotita, on Mediated: How the Media Shapes Your World and the Way You Live in It, and on postmodern individualism and "reality" TV; Eugene McCarraher, on how American management theory became an influential source of religious meaning and practice; and John Witte, Jr., on how law embodies a view of human nature, and why religious viewpoints have often been ignored.

Guests on Volume 79: Carson Holloway, on why sociobiology and evolutionary psychology are inadequate bases for sustaining political ideals; Peter Augustine Lawler, on why we are more than "individuals" narrowly defined; Hadley Arkes, on the difference, in law, between evidence from social scientific data and moral truths; Ben Witherington, III, on why The Da Vinci Code's implausible account of history seems credible to many people; Christopher Shannon, on Ivan Illich (Medical Nemesis) and the loss of belief in the possibility that suffering can be meaningful; Roger Lundin, on how nature and experience replaced revelation as a source of authority (and why they fail to serve as such), and on the necessity of humility in writing biographies.