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Mars Hill Audio Journal in Bulk, Volumes 80-84

Series Mars Hill Audio Journal
Author Mars Hill Audio
Narrator Ken Myers
Publisher Mars Hill Audio
Downloads ZIP M4B
Release Date June 5, 2014
Availability: Unrestricted (available worldwide)
Guests on Volume 80: Stephen A. McKnight, on The Religious Foundations of Francis Bacon's Thought; Tim Morris & Don Petcher, on science, Christology, and why segregating nature from supernature doesn't do justice to either; Vigen Guroian, on the mystical character of fragrance and on why working in his garden is an imitation of the Master Gardener; Paul Valliere, on Orthodox theology's engagement with questions concerning law, politics, and human nature, and on the ideas of Vladimir Soloviev (1853-1900); Vigen Guroian, on the importance of personality and community in the thought of Nicholas Berdyaev (1874-1948); and Calvin Stapert, on the affirmation of Creation and intimations of transcendence in the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Guests on Volume 81: Nigel Cameron, on the lack of ethical reflection in public policy on technology; Joel James Shuman, on beliefs about God's nature and purposes informing how we think about sickness and medicine; Brian Volck, on embodied life, stories, and how medical practice involves attending to the stories of the bodies of patients; Russell Hittinger, on the modern state giving rise to modern Catholic social thought; Mark Noll, on learning to think about law and politics from earlier Christians who lived in very different political circumstances; and Stephen Miller, on the factors that sustain the art of conversation, and why it's a dying art.

Guests on Volume 82: Stephen Gardner, on how modern culture weakens religion and establishes a new definition of the public; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, on Tom Wolfe and Philip Rieff's diagnosis of cultural disorder; Wilfred McClay, on how Philip Rieff's brilliant critique of modern disorder kept him from realizing a way out of our dilemma; David Wells, on how Western culture has eclipsed fundamental assumptions about human nature and God; James K. A. Smith, on the postmodern insight that our experience in the world requires interpretation (and that some interpretations are better than others); and Robert Littlejohn, on how education should encourage wisdom and eloquence in students.

Guests on Volume 83: Barrett Fisher, on film noir and its revealing portrayal of human moral confusion; Dick Keyes, on contemporary cynicism, how it's destructive, and how it might be resisted; Richard Lints, on a distinctively theological approach to understanding human identity; Paul McHugh, on how the discipline of psychiatry needs to mature, and on "stories" as diagnostic tools; Paul Weston, on lessons from Lesslie Newbigin on interfaith dialogue and the attacks on Christianity from scientism; and Paul Walker, on how the forms of Renaissance choral music communicate rich theological concerns.

Guests on Volume 84: Harry R. Lewis, on higher education's amnesia about its purposes, and how that shortchanges students; Nicholas Wolterstorff, on Abraham Kuyper (1837-1927), the French Revolution, worldviews, and "sphere sovereignty"; Brendan Sweetman, on why religious worldviews should not be excluded from political life; James Turner Johnson, on the development of Christian thought about the meaning of marriage; David Martin, on how the 1960s replayed themes of the 1890s and 1930s; and Edward Ericson, Jr., on Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's beginnings and legacy.
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Guests on Volume 80: Stephen A. McKnight, on The Religious Foundations of Francis Bacon's Thought; Tim Morris & Don Petcher, on science, Christology, and why segregating nature from supernature doesn't do justice to either; Vigen Guroian, on the mystical character of fragrance and on why working in his garden is an imitation of the Master Gardener; Paul Valliere, on Orthodox theology's engagement with questions concerning law, politics, and human nature, and on the ideas of Vladimir Soloviev (1853-1900); Vigen Guroian, on the importance of personality and community in the thought of Nicholas Berdyaev (1874-1948); and Calvin Stapert, on the affirmation of Creation and intimations of transcendence in the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Guests on Volume 81: Nigel Cameron, on the lack of ethical reflection in public policy on technology; Joel James Shuman, on beliefs about God's nature and purposes informing how we think about sickness and medicine; Brian Volck, on embodied life, stories, and how medical practice involves attending to the stories of the bodies of patients; Russell Hittinger, on the modern state giving rise to modern Catholic social thought; Mark Noll, on learning to think about law and politics from earlier Christians who lived in very different political circumstances; and Stephen Miller, on the factors that sustain the art of conversation, and why it's a dying art.

Guests on Volume 82: Stephen Gardner, on how modern culture weakens religion and establishes a new definition of the public; Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, on Tom Wolfe and Philip Rieff's diagnosis of cultural disorder; Wilfred McClay, on how Philip Rieff's brilliant critique of modern disorder kept him from realizing a way out of our dilemma; David Wells, on how Western culture has eclipsed fundamental assumptions about human nature and God; James K. A. Smith, on the postmodern insight that our experience in the world requires interpretation (and that some interpretations are better than others); and Robert Littlejohn, on how education should encourage wisdom and eloquence in students.

Guests on Volume 83: Barrett Fisher, on film noir and its revealing portrayal of human moral confusion; Dick Keyes, on contemporary cynicism, how it's destructive, and how it might be resisted; Richard Lints, on a distinctively theological approach to understanding human identity; Paul McHugh, on how the discipline of psychiatry needs to mature, and on "stories" as diagnostic tools; Paul Weston, on lessons from Lesslie Newbigin on interfaith dialogue and the attacks on Christianity from scientism; and Paul Walker, on how the forms of Renaissance choral music communicate rich theological concerns.

Guests on Volume 84: Harry R. Lewis, on higher education's amnesia about its purposes, and how that shortchanges students; Nicholas Wolterstorff, on Abraham Kuyper (1837-1927), the French Revolution, worldviews, and "sphere sovereignty"; Brendan Sweetman, on why religious worldviews should not be excluded from political life; James Turner Johnson, on the development of Christian thought about the meaning of marriage; David Martin, on how the 1960s replayed themes of the 1890s and 1930s; and Edward Ericson, Jr., on Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's beginnings and legacy.