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Slave

Author John F. MacArthur
Narrator John MacArthur
Runtime 5.1 Hrs. - Unabridged
Publisher Thomas Nelson
Downloads ZIP MP3 M4B
Release Date February 15, 2011
Availability: Unrestricted (available worldwide)
Throughout the Bible, followers of Jesus are commanded to submit to Him as their King. They are told to obey and follow, faithfully and without hesitation. Every time Christians utter the word Lord, they make a subtle yet profound declaration—that God is their Master and that they belong to Him. In fact, the Bible describes believers as His slaves. They have been bought with a price and now live for Christ as a people for His own possession.
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Description
Throughout the Bible, followers of Jesus are commanded to submit to Him as their King. They are told to obey and follow, faithfully and without hesitation. Every time Christians utter the word Lord, they make a subtle yet profound declaration—that God is their Master and that they belong to Him. In fact, the Bible describes believers as His slaves. They have been bought with a price and now live for Christ as a people for His own possession.

But go into most churches today, even flip through most Bible translations, and you won’t see or hear the word slave anywhere. That’s because it has been lost in translation. In this gripping book, Dr. John MacArthur uses deep Bible teaching and historical evaluation to expertly uncover the one forgotten word that restores the Bible’s definition of true Christian freedom.

What does it mean to be a Christian the way Jesus defined it? MacArthur says it all boils down to one word: Slave. "We have been bought with a price. We belong to Christ. We are His own possession."

Customer Reviews

14 Reviews Add Review
Must read.
Highly recommend. This book will bring you closer to the Lord.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 2/9/2018)
Must-Listen for All English Speaking Christians
I received a printed copy of MacArthur's Slave through the Amazon Vine Reviewers Program and an audiobook version through ChristianAudio's reviewers program.

I was blessed to be at the Shepherd's Conference where John MacArthur preached the sermon that would turn into this book. I had been affected by the sermon at the time, and now after reading and listening to the book, I don't think I'll ever be able to think of my relationship to Jesus the same again.

The premise of the book is that a the Greek word Doulos has been mistranslated as servant or bondservant in our English Bibles for so many centuries that we miss the point of the most commonly used analogy for the Christian's relationship to Jesus in the Bible: Slaves. Jesus is Lord, Kurios, the master of slaves and we are his douloi, his slaves. This sounds grating to so many Christian ears even though this truth of the Bible has been staring us in the faces. We just couldn't see it.

MacArthur masterfully exposes was the Bible means when it refers to us in this manner, making very good application. The common objections (doesn't it say we aren't slaves but friends?) are discussed in a balanced and fair way. MacArthur doesn't try to stretch the analogy beyond the God's intended meaning in the text, but neither will he let us settle for the watered down, mistranslation-that-misses-the-meaning servant.

Much of the book is spent helping the 21st century reading understand what it meant to be in a slave-master relationship in 1st century Rome. The Hebrew Old Testament concepts that affect the Bibles use of the terms (YHWH, etc) are also well discussed.

He also spends a few chapters discussing another very important analogy for our relationship to God that we must hold tightly as we consider the call for us to become slaves: Our sonship.

The book is saturated with Bible from front to back. Dr. MacArthur is careful to let the text speak for itself. He certainly is making a point, but he does a great job of letting the text of Scripture make it.

I cannot believe how blind I was to the glorious and gracious truth that I am now a slave to Christ, redeemed out of the slave market of sin by His own blood. I knew all of that, sure, but I did not see it permeating all the pages of Scripture. And I think Dr. MacArthur has done us a great service by helping us see a simple, profound truth that bad translation of a single word has obscured for English speakers.

The audiobook is very well done. John MacArthur himself reads the text of the book. It is a very good pace and rhythm. It's a little bit slower than many other audiobook readers, but I think that's perfect to give the listener time to digest what is being heard. I recommend that you both read and listen to this book. If you can't do both, pick one. But you will not be disappointed, and you will certainly not be unaffected.
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 5/10/2011)
Is Jesus Lord or your Buddy?
Many thanks to the christianaudio.com Reviewer’s program and the opportunity to write on this audio.

Reviewer: Derek R. Iannelli-Smith

RECOMMENDED: A familial consistency from John MacArthur through strong historical grammatical reformed discipleship, reminding us of the gospel again!

A balanced view of the translational conspiracy on being a doulos (or slave, or in particular our slavery to Christ) and the role of Christ as kurios (Lord and Master).

Solid Solus Christus theme throughout, combined with great historical exposition on the stories of Huss, Spurgeon, Newton, Luther, some Piper quotes and great contextualization on doulos and kurios as it related to the 1st century church and the church today.


MacArthur says that doulos is used in the Greek New Testament 124 times, usually in describing the believer’s relationship to Christ: "Paul, a bond-servant [doulos] of Christ Jesus, called as an apostle, set apart for the gospel of God…" (Romans 1:1, NASB). At the same time, the Greek word kyrios, translated as "master," is often used for Christ. In first century Rome, where the slave/master relationship was well known, there was no avoiding what these terms signified. – Discerning Reader

This was a refreshing exhilaration for renewing my mind as I know it will be for other MacArthur fans. Having John MacArthur as the narrator of the audio book was also great. There is just something ‘better’ when the author reads their own work.

One of the main themes of the work is that we are reminded that we are slaves to Christ because we have been redeemed from our old master, sin, that "cruel tyrant" and the old has gone and the new has come, and we are no longer in bondage to sin because we have been reconciled and now ambassadors or reconciliation.

MacArthur does a superb job of explaining the gospel rightly understood from a slave perspective something that is not too well received by our western hearts. He goes on further to rightly place the Lordship of Christ in the pre-eminence it deserves while sharing the hope of scriptures saturated throughout the book. No proof-texting here, all solid exegesis and excellent context.

This is not new material for MacArthur however, in that he has been sharing this information for a while. My wife and I saw a message by him last year on GTY on DirecTV that intrigued us to the point that when he came to Charleston SC recently, we we to see him speak on this topic at a small African American church downtown (think about that for a minute). It was great to hear some of these items in person as well. A well done YouTube promo for the book can be found here.

The audio book flows smoothly and MacArthur is such a great teacher that you are involved from the very moment is starts. It is well done and I highly recommend it. This book will teach, rebuke, remind, admonish and exhort you about the privilege it is to be Slaves to Christ rather than Slaves to sin.

I feel so strongly about the message of this material that I am going to give away a copy of the hard cover book if you leave a comment on why you would be interested in this material (only 1 copy for give away, media mail, and US only).


"What does it mean to be a Christian the way Jesus defined it? MacArthur says it all boils down to one word: Slave. We have been bought with a price. We belong to Christ. We are His own possession."

I agree with the GTY website, “Embrace for yourself what the Bible really teaches about slavery—your relationship with Jesus Christ will never be the same.”



Were you a slave when called? Do not be concerned about it. (But if you can gain your freedom, avail yourself of the opportunity.) 22 For he who was called in the Lord as a slave is a freedman of the Lord. Likewise he who was free when called is a slave of Christ. 23 You were bought with a price; do not become slaves of men. 1 Corinthians 7:21-23 http://www.esvapi.org/assets/play.swf?myUrl=hw%2F46007021-46007023(ESV)
Overall
Review by / (Posted on 4/8/2011)
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